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King’s Legacy Has Become A Shakespearean Tragedy

“If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as a Michelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry.”

That was Rev. Martin Luther King’s appeal to work as soulcraft in his 1967 “Street Sweeper” speech at New Covenant Baptist Church in Chicago.

Today those words are blasphemy to Leftist elites who invoke his name while seeking to expunge from history those names King called forth.

Yale dropped Shakespeare as required reading for English Literature majors—as have most of America’s top-ranked universities—in response to the contention that his transcendental works on human nature somehow create a hostile campus environment for persons of color.

King was a man of letters who argued the purpose of education was to “teach one to think intensively and think critically.”

Today the politicized professoriate would rather students not think at all. 

King understood Escalus’ observation in Measure for Measure that, “Some by sin do rise and others by virtue fall.” 

It’s a Shakespearean tragedy for black and white alike that so few of today’s students do.

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