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Governor Rauner

Who Are the Real “Rinos” In The IL GOP?

Why is IL Conservative Party candidate for governor, State Sen. Sam McCann, sending out mailers attacking conservative legislators? Is McCann doing Madigan’s bidding trying to take out suburban Republicans? Does he want another Madigan supermajority? Does he still have a path to victory? Candidate for governor, Sam McCann joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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IL Ruling Class Propping Up Obamacare

Is Illinois’ Political Ruling Class doing their best to prop up Obamacare? Why do big government Republicans continue to do the bidding for the other side that despises them? Why are millions of people using plans to escape Obamacare having increased premiums of more than 200%? HeathInsuranceMentors.com's CS Tucker joins Dan and Shaun Thompson to discuss.

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Does The "Conservative Party" Have A Chance In IL?

Does State Sen. Sam McCann have a real shot in the governor’s race against the billionaires? Has Madigan and his machine gotten more accomplished under Rauner than any other Democratic governor in the past? What about the rumors that McCann is supported by the unions and a Madigan plant to pull voters from Rauner? "Conservative Party" candidate for governor State Sen. Sam McCann joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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IL GOP’s Purge Of Conservatives

Does the Rauner Party only like primaries when they want to get someone out they don’t like? What’s the future of the Illinois Republican Party? Will there be a challenge to party chairman Schneider? Lake County Sheriff Mark Curran joins Dan and Amy to discuss the unity Rauner and the IL GOP establishment preach, while they pursue a purge of conservatives from the party.

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Is More Kash The Answer To Illinois’ Fiscal Mess?

Is a third party candidate a viable alternative to the two leftist plutocrats representing the major parties? The Libertarian party fights to maximize freedom and minimize government, but can social conservatives feel comfortable voting for him? Liberals say there should be less money in politics, but should there be more Kash? Libertarian candidate for Illinois Governor Kash Jackson joins Dan and Amy to discuss his campaign platform and what he needs to get on the ballot.

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Proft: Top of the morning, Dan and Amy. And, we've got a governor's election in Illinois, obviously other statewide Constitutional offices as well, legislative races. But with two Leftist plutocrats running... Jacobson: Yeah, I don't know which one's more progressive. Proft: Leftist...yeah. Jacobson: Yeah. Governor Rauner and JB. Proft: Well, it's a stiff competition, and that's the only thing stiff between the two of those. Jacobson: Hey-oh! Proft: But...is this an option...a third-party candidacy? Is that something you'll consider this cycle? I mean, this is very much like Gary Johnson's run, when you had two candidates of the two major parties that were not particularly well-liked by the electorate. So the question for Kash Jackson, Libertarian candidate for Illinois...is do you know where Allepo is? Do you know what that is? Because we don't want you to fall prey to the Gary Johnson problem! Jackson (in studio): I think I pinpointed it. Proft: Okay, very good. And the reason you can is because you're somewhat steeped in these geopolitical and national security issues because your background is military. Jackson: Absolutely, yes. Spent 20 years in the United States Navy, retired in 2016 at the ripe old age of 37, and so yeah, I did have the opportunity to travel all around the world, circumnavigate the globe. Albeit, we did cheat inside the submarine, we went to the top of the globe and did the smallest circle we possibly could, but I think it "circumnavigate the globe", yeah. I did my time in the military, and now I'm in politics. Proft: Hotrodding in a nuclear sub. Jackson: Absolutely. Proft: All right, very good. Jacobson: That's the only way to go! The only way to travel. But you were born in Louisiana, but you were stationed up here for a while. And now do you live here, you call this place home? Jackson: Yeah, so right now I live up in Antioch, in Lake County. I'm maybe two miles from the Wisconsin border (Proft: Oh yeah.), and love it up there, live up there around a bunch of big horse farms, and my little three-bedroom, one-bath farmhouse, and I like it up there. Proft: Well so, speaking of that, we did a story in one of my papers about that, talking about the property taxes...Lake County I think has the...is the county...22nd or 23rd ranked county in the NATION in terms of terms of highest property taxes. So you're talking about 4 and 5% of home value up there, HUGE issue. And in Antioch, we compared a couple of house on Cross Lake, one on the Wisconsin side, one on the Illinois side, just about five piers apart. And the BIGGER house on the Wisconsin side had a tax bill, a property tax bill, that was about half of the smaller house on the Wisconsin (sic, meant Illinois) side, and this in part is a way to just sort of crystallize and tell the story about property taxation in Illinois. And I wonder, where you come down on what we should do about the highest property taxes in the nation. Jackson: Well, you know...and it's something that personally affected me. I owned a home there in Lake Villa, purchased it in 2009 whenever I was first stationed up here. My property taxes that year were $4500. I sold that home in 2015, my taxes were just shy of $9000. And it was... Proft: That's almost a doubling in six years, right? Jackson: It did, yeah. It effectively doubled in a six year time frame. And I'm a fan of the Illinois Policy Institute, and the proposals they have made to address property taxes. I would like to see a five-year property tax freeze enacted for (?), to give people's wages time to kind of catch up, but then to work to regress those taxes, they're entirely too much, and they're really hurting Illinois citizens, and we know it's a large part of our out-migration statewide. Jacobson: So, why are you running for Governor? Jackson: Well... Jacobson: Basic question, but I DO want to know! Jackson: Well yes, it is a basic question, but... Proft: Ted Kennedy could answer it! Jacobson: You've had an accomplished career, and you're retired now, and you were a...drill sergeant up here at...? Jackson: Yeah, well so, we're called a Recruit Division Commander, but in layman's terms, a drill instructor. Jacobson: Okay, a drill instructor... Proft: At Great Lakes. Jacobson: Great Lakes! Jackson: Yes. Jacobson: So, why do you want to be governor? Jackson: Well, I want to be governor because I swore an oath to defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic, for the better part of two decades. And we can see every single day here in Illinois, where our Constitutional rights are being continuously infringed upon...recently we had...there in Deerfield, where they just passed their Township ordinance where you can't possess semi-automatic firearms, pistols and rifles. And it's things like that that drove me into politics. I'm like, this is absolutely uncalled for in a country that I served for 20 years. Proft: And why the Libertarian Party, as opposed to the other two major parties? Jackson: Well, I believe in maximizing freedom and minimizing government, and I don't think that anyone can argue that the size of government, with 7K local units of government in our state, is entirely too large. That's exactly what I want to do, I want to shrink big government, and I want to maximize personal individual freedoms, and the Libertarian Party is the one that seeks to do that. Jacobson: And you need help still getting on the ballot, correct? Tell us about that. Jackson: Yeah, so ballot access is extremely restricted for third parties and independents, and I have to get 25K minimum good signatures to get onto the ballot. And, it's an uphill climb, but it's something that the Libertarian Party has been successful at in previous election cycles, and it's something we'll be successful at this year as well. Jacobson: And how many signatures do you have so far? Proft: It's only just started, he's been allowed to circulate in the last...week, right? Jackson: Week, yeah. So we just started petition circulation a week ago, and I would venture to say, just guessing here, that we're probably over a thousand right now. Proft: Yeah. So...so, you get the 50K signatures, so you can withstand a challenge, good signatures, you get on the ballot...is the real goal here 5%? And then, because...5%, for those who don't know, means that the Libertarian Party would then be able to run and have the same access as the Republican and Democrat Party, in terms of signature requirements and time frame and that sort of thing. Jackson: Absolutely. So, 5% is absolutely a goal that we have and want to achieve, for us to become an established party in the state, make no mistake, making us competitive in 2020 for local elections. And we can see that in places like McLean County, where we've got 8 individuals running for local seats there, because Gary Johnson had broken 5% in that County whenever he ran. And that's something that I think we need to do, and I think where it really benefits Illinois citizens when we do that is that in areas that are heavily gerrymandered, where it's really not feasible for, say, a Republican to run, a candidate inside a Democratic stronghold, Libertarians can be much more competitive inside that area, and this is an area where it would really benefit Illinois citizens to have third parties like the Libertarian Party have that ballot access to do that, and then take some of those seats. Proft: And...let me suggest that this is your argument, you tell me if I'm right...is that Libertarians...I mean, sometimes people have the perception because of the free market nature of Libertarian economic thought, that...well, that "Libertarians? Well, they just take votes away from Republicans!", and in point of fact, if you look at some Libertarian candidates, they pull...now, it's not big numbers at this point...they pull in from both parties. So, they can pull in some Bernie Sanders types, and then they can pull in some Friedman-ites on the...that would otherwise vote Republican. Jackson: Absolutely. You know, generally speaking, we do pull about an even number from Republicans and Democrats. And it's not uncommon for me to hear "Well, you're going to steal votes!" Well, I'm not stealing anything, I'm EARNING people's votes by getting my voice out there, and campaigning, and putting the work in to earn those votes. That's what I'm doing, and if a Republican or Democrat loses the election, and they feel it's because of that, I'm gonna tell 'em "Well, you didn't WORK hard enough, and you should have earned those votes the same way that I did." Jacobson: So, what are you hearing about people's concerns as you travel, you know, through the Counties, and...besides property taxes, I know, is there anything else? Jackson: Absolutely. The pension system is, of course, a looming issue, when we have between $130B to $200B in unfunded pensions, and again I'm going to sort of revert back to the pragmatic point of view from the Illinois Policy Institute, to incorporate the 401(k) system in the state of Illinois, and those are the two largest issues I run into is just the pensions and property taxes. And third, of course, is jobs, and if we can address those two, the two large issues, then of course we can start working towards bringing jobs back in Illinois as well. So, those are kind of the three big ones. Proft: Where are you on some of the other contentious, in some respects, emotional issues, but also moral issues. Because, you've got two people who are on the same side on so many issues; sanctuary state, taxpayer funding of abortion...not so much on guns, you know...junk science, I would say, on gender and so...it provides an opportunity, maybe, for social conservatives to feel comfortable voting Libertarian, but that requires that your positions would be different than Rauner's or Pritzker's. Jackson: Right, well I will say this...just as an individual, I am personally pro-life, whereas the Libertarian Party itself doesn't take a position, and says that the government should not be involved in any regard, I am personally pro-life and that's something that I will espouse very readily. And that's something that differentiates myself between Bruce Rauner and JB Pritzker. Uh...immigration is another big issue, and that's one where I'll probably align more with on Conservatives, because I don't believe that individuals that are here, that are honestly working, that have jobs, many of them are entrepreneurs, I think I've read in the Harvard Business Review that about 15% of immigrants have their own businesses, and they account for about 25% of the entrepreneurial market, and so those people who are here, and they are working and contributing, I would like to see it streamlined so those people that are working and contributing, that we could help ease that process to transition them into naturalized citizens. But those that are violent criminals, those that cannot conform to American ideals and values, I would definitely be an advocate of immediately deporting, especially any violent criminals. Proft: What about Sanctuary City and Sanctuary State designations? Jackson: I am...you know, because I'm a Libertarian, I'm not a fan of helping out the Federal government to do THEIR job. It is the Federal Government's job to enforce immigration. It is not the state's job to enforce immigration. My job is to find real viable solutions to issues, very complex issues, that we're facing, and one of the most complex issues that our state is facing is out-migration, and if we have people here that are working, and they're willing to work, I would much rather find a more fiscally and morally responsible approach to help naturalize those people that WANT to be American citizens and uphold those values. Proft: Well, you can't have it both ways. You can't say on the one hand, there's a naturalization issue and that's a Federal policy issue and I want to get involved in that, but when it comes to Federal immigration law enforcement, I don't want to get involved, because that's a Federal issue. So if you want to be involved as an advocate, you have to be willing to weigh in on the range of issues. So the question is, if you were Governor, and it got to your desk, would you repeal Sanctuary State or would you veto that legislation? Jackson: Umm...that would be a decision that I would have to come to with my policy team, to really find out whether or not that is something that is a moral...morally responsible thing to do, is it fiscally responsible? Because immigrants ARE providing a tremendous amount of revenue to our state. They do help to lower costs in a variety of areas. They are paying, when they rent places, into property taxes. So, in all honesty, that could potentially hurt our state, and so that's something that we have to take a very very close look at, and it's not something that I would just jump to and make a decision on. Jacobson: On a lighter note, besides your parents giving you the name "Kash"...is it a family name? Jackson: No, it's actually a chosen name. So it's Grayson Kash Jackson, and I actually went through a formal name change about a year ago, and I did so because I was raised by maternal grandparents, I was not raised by the paternal side of my family. And I wanted to pay tribute to both sides of my family, so I chose the name Grayson Kash Jackson. Proft: Interesting. And then you've got the AG candidate, on the Libertarian slate...named Bubba. So you got Bubba and Kash, which sounds like a buddy cop film. Jackson: "Bubba and Kash", yep! Jacobson: And then also too, in the governor's race, they can say "They may have millions, but we have the Kash!" Jackson: "But we have the Kash!", right! Jacobson: Get it? Proft: No, I don't get it. Right, so how many hundreds of millions of dollars of your own money are you going to put into this race? (Jacobson: Yeah!) Jackson: Well, you know I think I still have $5 in change in my truck right now, (both laugh) but I'm probably gonna have to use that on tolls on the way back home. Proft: Mmm...what about that? What about, you know, as a candidate, even if they're, you know, there are more modest and attainable goals, and there's nothing wrong with that, thinking long-term about the party, I wish REPUBLICANS would do the same thing in this state but they don't, but what about getting your message out and maximize your opportunity with the prospect of two candidates that are going to slug it out with hundreds of millions of dollars, and both probably end up not being particularly popular among the general electorate? Jackson: Right, well you know what? I was really impressed with Jeanne Ives' campaign, the fact that they ran such a strong grassroots effort, I think they spent on average $12 per vote, as opposed to Bruce Rauner's $250 per vote, which just goes to show you that money doesn't always equate to success. She was very very successful in that campaign, and that's something we want to seek to duplicate in our campaign. Jacobson: All right. Proft: All right. Jacobson: Now, where can people learn more information about you? Jackson: They can go to Kash2018.com, Kash with a K, and they can also...I'm on Facebook, I'm on Twitter, I'm on Instagram, so if you just search Kash Jackson, Kash with a K, it's not gonna be too hard to find me. Jacobson: "Kash...Kash Jackson!" Proft: Yeah, you gotta just gotta do some fun videos, just with the circus name, get Carl Weathers to endorse you, or "Action Jackson" to endorse Kash Jackson, something to make this indelible. Kash Jackson, Libertarian candidate for governor. You can follow him on Twitter at Kash, with a K, @KashJackson2018, you just heard the website. Kash, thanks so much for joining us, appreciate it. Jackson: Thank you guys for having me on!

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Shrinking Party In A Shrinking State

How did GOP candidate for governor, Jeanne Ives, go from trailing 40 points behind Rauner in January to narrowly losing in the Primary less than three months later? Can Rauner look himself in the mirror and be proud of the campaign he ran? What is it going to take to rehabilitate the Republican Party brand in Illinois? State Rep. Jeanne Ives joins Dan and Amy to discuss the primary results and what’s next for the conservative grassroots movement.

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Ives' Closing Argument Against Rauner

Chicago leads the nation in underwater home mortgages. Two words: property taxes. What would GOP candidate for Governor, Jeanne Ives, do about it? Has Rauner lost all credibility with not only his deceptive campaign lies but with his overall record? What does Ives say to people who say she can’t win a general election? State Rep. and conservative candidate for Governor, Jeanne Ives joins Dan and Amy to give her closing arguments as to why she’s a better choice than incumbent Gov. Rauner. 

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Ives Stoking The Revolt Against The IL Ruling Class

Are you proud of the job Rauner has done? Are you proud of the campaign he's run? Are you happy living in the worst run state in the country? If no, then it's a yes to Ives on March 20th. GOP Primary candidate for Governor, State Rep. Jeanne Ives joins Dan and Amy to discuss Rauner’s dismal record, laughable campaign lies, and potential legal battle for using state resources and employees for political purposes.

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Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy, and Jeanne Ives is up with her "Closing Argument" ads on television, you hear them on our station too when the breaks. But, a more interesting closing argument I think, or another interesting closing argument was made by Tom Morrison, who's been on the show before, he's a conservative Republican from Palatine, he's also one of the most respected legislators in the General Assembly, on both sides of the aisle, because he's a person of integrity. He's out walking for Jeanne Ives, and he filmed a little impromptu Facebook Live post. Morrison (Tape): Hello everyone, it's Tom Morrison, walking door-to-door here in Palatine. We're not fazed by snow or sleet or any of this...we're trying to elect my friend for Governor, Jeanne Ives. And the information that we're passing out deconstructs all these shameful Rauner TV and radio ads, trying to take her words out of context, distort her record, it's so easy to deconstruct these arguments if you actually know the facts. Look, I'm supporting Jeanne Ives because she's the REAL conservative in this race, she has the endorsements of me and NINE other state legislators from across the state, Republican organizations, conservative organizations, are supporting Jeanne Ives. So many of us trusted Bruce Rauner in 2014 and he really let us down these last three and a half years, and that's why we're supporting her. There has been no greater fighter for taxpayers or families than Jeanne Ives. Proft: Alright. And with that intro, we're pleased to be joined again by state Representative and Republican candidate for Governor, Jeanne Ives. Jeanne, thanks for joining us again, appreciate it. Ives: Thank you for having me on, Dan and Amy. I'm just...Tom Morrison is such a blessing, he's just been a real leader in this campaign. Proft: So what about...he's responding to the sole argument that Rauner has had against you for the past eight weeks, and 20 million dollar backing of that argument, that you're Madigan's favorite Republican? Ives: You don't have to trust my words, trust what everybody else says, who's been watching my work down there. They all know it's laughable, I mean even Greg Hines said, you know, Rauner gets the Oscar award for the most deceptive campaign lie this season. So just listen to what others say, you don't have to depend on my opinion, it's just not flat out right...it's not true. Jacobson: So, yesterday was the last debate before the primary, which is next Tuesday, and Governor Rauner, I noticed, was a no-show, you had the floor all to yourself. Any reason why he wasn't there? Ives: Well, he doesn't want to talk about his record, because he has no record of accomplishment, and quite frankly, he doesn't want to answer policy questions because he'll be embarrassed, just like he was before the Chicago Tribune Editorial Board. That was a pretty scathing debate that I had with him there, and it...you know, the headline that came out from there said that I CRUSHED him. It's because he does not know his policy, and it matters to people. Jacobson: Yeah, well one thing that he did do yesterday, he did veto the state's gun bill, but I noticed that he did it far far away from Chicago Media, he was at a radio station downstate, and said this. Rauner (Tape): That gun dealers are already Federally licensed, that is true. Jacobson: And I mean, obviously I watched you on Channel 7, and you agreed that the gun bill should have been vetoed, but do you think this is all political? Ives: Absolutely. It's just political expediency on his part. He...this campaign, and me specifically, boxed him into a corner on that gun bill. He knew he had to veto it if he was going to even have any chance on March 20th, which we...we think he's done on March 20th, but this is what he's done all the time. He'll never signal to you what he's going to do. So, he refused to fill out the NRA Survey in 2014, he didn't fill it out in 2018. But what you see with me, though, it's like...I will tell you ahead of time exactly how I feel about an issue, and I'm not going to hide behind a downstate radio state, where media can't respond or ask any targeted questions. But this is Governor Rauner, he's just ducking and hiding from the voters at every turn. Never tells you what to do...what he's going to do, and I guarantee you...he WILL sign those other gun bills, so he's getting ready to betray everybody else on the Second Amendment. Proft: Yeah, there was a change, because he said he would deal with the legislation after the primary initially, that was some of his offerings on what he was going to do on the topic of that gun bill, and then yesterday he hastily announced that he was going to veto it, and he vetoed it. So, this to me seems like it's another...because his internal numbers must be wobbly...this is a way for him to try and snow gun owners the way that he initially snowed so many people when he ran for office. Ives: But, Dan...this is a perfect example of who he is, and how we've seen him over the last three years. He's been back and forth on every major political decision. The Caucus, the Republican Caucus, who is closest to him and understands what's going in Springfield...first the Education Bill is a disaster, and then he signs it and his buddy Rahm says "I got everything I wanted, and more!" The Exelon Bill...the morning of, up to TEN AMENDMENTS, because Governor Rauner couldn't signal how he really felt about things and kept waffling and waffling. Finally, they get to the point where he's boxed in, and he signs the darn thing just to say he got something done. So the guy is...he has no CORE, so you don't know where he's ever gonna go on policy. He's just a transactional politician...just like Democrats have been. Jacobson: Yep. So you're on the driveway home, this is the last weekend before the election. What are your plans, where are you travelling, where are you trying to get the vote out? Ives: We're going down south today, I'm so excited, we're headed to the Metro East area, just outside of St. Louis so we're flying into Cahokia. We have a meeting there at 11:30, then we're headed to Marion right afterwards, meeting with some voters there at about 3:30, then we're flying up to Champaign, and we'll be there from 6:00 to 7:30 at the airport there, the finally we'll end up in Rockford at about 8:30, just connecting with voters outside of the Chicago area, just because we did Chicago media for the past two days, just trying to let people know who we are and where this campaign is headed. Proft: Story out yesterday, there's been a number of stories by the Edgar County Watchdogs, that we talked about on this show but hasn't really been picked up in any significant way, Capital Facts picked it up yesterday, but it's about emails they have from Diana Rauner, and the latest is perhaps the most damaging, it prompted the Edgar County Watchdogs to file a complaint with the Office of the Inspector General, the Executive...the Executive Office of the Inspector General, against Governor Rauner, accusing him of essentially using state resources for political purposes, which is the bases on which a couple of former Governors went to prison. And I wonder if you have a comment on what Rauner's...Rauner's response is "Oh yeah, any OIG investigation we will comply with, but there's no merit to this." Based on what the Edgar County Watchdogs have from these emails, where you have political people directing state people, it would appear...what comment do you have in terms of what the Governor should do? ...or not do? Ives: Every single email that has both a political staffer of Governor Rauner's and a paid state employee on the same email chain should be released immediately. I'm alarmed the fact that he would even put the same political staff in the same meeting room with state employees. That's alarming to begin with...I mean,as a state Rep, I would NEVER do that! I would never do it, I can't believe the Governor is open about doing it. And the emails, you know, and obviously they're also coming from his wife, I mean, she's even the one propagating some of this. Proft: Well, and the interesting thing (Ives: It's very alarming!) thing...and the interesting thing about the email that the Edgar County Watchdogs used as the frame for their most recent story is that you have Diana Rauner as the emailER, and the recipients include both political consultants and state employees, but they're using state employees' private email. So this is a way they were trying to essentially end run a FOIA and discoverability, but the Edgar County Watchdogs got the email anyway, and if there's...if there's a handful of those, as has been reported, you know there are many more. Ives: No doubt. And just the handful that we have already is actually cause enough for the complaint that the Edgar County Watchdogs put forward, and you know, even after Marasco wrote his memo saying "Look, you are really crossing the line here, potentially violating ethics laws in the state of Illinois," even after that, you find out when you look at the timeline, there's a report in the complaint that, sure enough, Rauner is officially signing the K-12 School Funding Bill, which is definitely something that Diana and political consultants weighed in on, to help save the Governor on that bill. And then he signs the Abortion Bill. And then he makes a comment about Repeal and Replace Obamacare, which for him is politically advantageous on HOW he responds to that. Proft: He didn't want...he didn't...he didn't want... Ives: So you see, even after he's warned, you see actions being taken. So there's a lot of missing emails there on what happened. Proft: And on the Obamacare, he didn't WANT Obamacare repealed and replaced? Ives: That's right. (Proft and Jacobson react with stunned surprise.) That's right. Jacobson: So when you travel, and when you meet people throughout the state of Illinois, and DuPage County and Cook County, what's their number one concern, what's their point of contention? Ives: Well, for Republicans it's largely the Sanctuary State bill, taxpayer funding of abortion, and just...people don't trust Rauner anymore. He's not somebody that he said he was going to be, and...you know, this wholesale disregard for what he's been doing to the state. So, it's a trust issue for Republican voters on March 20th. Proft: You mentioned the Education Funding Bill, and how Diana Rauner intervened to help prop him up. But that was a bill you voted against, why is that? Explain to people your perspective on that Ed funding bill that he counts as a success. Ives: Well, there's a couple things. One, Chicago got a massive bailout, and they have $17B in debt. And what's going to happen over time, really, is downstate schools, suburban schools, are gonna see their school money actually siphoned off through the state funding formula, and it's gonna go to Chicago to bail out their massive debt. The other two...the other thing is they never corrected the assessment problem. Chicago is hiding massive amounts of property wealth from the Education Funding Bill, and we told Rauner three years ago, you have to fix this assessment system. It's foundational to a fair education funding formula, and if you don't fix it, you fix NOTHING with Education. And he didn't do it. He didn't lead on the issue even though we gave him a PROGRAM to do so, and he hasn't fixed anything in Education, he just basically bailed out Chicago. Proft: What...one of the political arguments that Rauner and the kind of defenseless Rauner supporter makes against you is that Rauner is the only one that can beat JB Pritzker, because he's the only one with the big checkbook. How do you respond to, you know, you...Jeanne Ives can't win a general election. Ives: Well, first of all, we're gonna win March 20th, and Rauner had a big checkbook, and we're gonna spend a fraction of what he has in his war chest. So, I think that people are ready for the truth, and when it comes to JB Pritzker, and what he's selling, and what the Democrats all want, which is higher taxes, more spending, and they're gonna continue the corrupt nature of Illinois politics as it's been for years, we're gonna message that past their money and past their money spend. And people are just gonna look past the fact that...you know, here's the deal. With me, you know where I stand on every issue...with JB Pritzker, you have no idea. You know, all you know is that he likes to pull the toilets out of his second mansion to get a property tax break. And he's buddies with Blagojevich and he's got all these other nefarious contacts with state government that has destroyed the Illinois economy. So, we think we can message that, you don't...we're going to prove that the grassroots can actually take back the state, and it's not gonna take a billionaire to do so. Proft: Tell me, so this is what...something like I want to say...and this...this is about stoking the revolt against the ruling class, like we've seen throughout the Midwest. Ives: Precisely, and if you...nobody believes that any of the Democrats, or Rauner for that matter, is really going to transform Illinois the way that we need to, look. Worst run state in the country, second year in a row. Largest outmigration, second year in a row. And you know, look at the Florida job creation. Florida has gained, since 2000, well over a million jobs. Illinois' growth in that time? 21K jobs. That's pathetic for the 5th largest economy in the United States. So, you know, people are leaving Illinois, and nobody's talking about the real issues except for this campaign, except for me. And nobody, and nobody believes that any of the other candidates are going to actually transform Illinois and really lead the revolt, like you talked about, against the political ruling class. I've already done that. Proft: So, what's the question you want to implant in Republican voters minds when they go to the polls on March 20th? What do you want them to be asking themselves and answering affirmatively, Jeanne Ives. Ives: They should ask themselves "Are you proud of this Republican governor? Are you proud of the job that he's done?" And then, "Are you proud of the way he's run his campaign, with lies and deception?" Those are two important questions for Republican voters to answer. And I think on March 20th when they go into the ballot box...go to the ballot box, they're going to vote for Jeanne Ives. Proft: Alright, she is Jeanne Ives, Republican candidate for Governor, state Rep from Wheaton, Jeanne thanks so much for joining us, appreciate it. Ives: Thank you!

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An Inside Look At Diana Rauner's Political Influence

Newly leaked emails show just how influential First Lady Diana Rauner was in moving the governor's office to the left, and making political calculations to try and improve the governor's image despite policy failures. On this week's "Illinois Rising" Pat Hughes and Brian Timpone talk to Edgar County Watchdogs' Kirk Allen about the newly obtained info, and what it tells Illinoisans about the inner workings of the governor's office. Hughes and Timpone also talk to Joshua Griffith, who is challenging sitting Republican state Rep. Norine Hammond, about his race railing against tax hikes. Also this week – what would a progressive tax mean for your family? A new proposal in Springfield shows income taxes going up on just about everyone.

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More Momentum On Crackdown Of Sanctuary Cities After Steinle Verdict

Did the politics of immigration policy factor into the Kate Steinle jury verdict? It was Chicago and Illinois politics as usual after Gov. Rauner promised, on national television, to meet with Brian McCann and his organization to discuss their point of view on sanctuary state legislation but never actually reached out to them. Brian McCann, brother of Dennis McCann who was killed in Chicago by an illegal immigrant and a member of Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime, joins Dan and Amy to discuss the Steinle verdict and Illinois’ sanctuary state designation.

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Proft: Dan and Amy. In February of 2016, New York Police officer Peter Liang was convicted of manslaughter for ricochet shooting a black man. Jacobson: Oh... Proft: Jury in Brooklyn found Liang guilty in connection with the death of a 28 year old black man who was killed by a bullet fired from Liang's gun, in November of 2014. Liang, the police officer, testified that a sudden noise startled him, causing his finger to slip onto the trigger and fire the gun, and it ricocheted off the wall and hit...hit the victim. Jacobson: Well it's weird, you know. Because Kate Steinle's MURDERER...he accidentally pulled the trigger, it ricocheted off the ground, 80 feet into her back, and killed her. Involuntary manslaughter for me, if I was a juror, but he got off on that charge. Proft: Yeah, it's interesting to compare and contrast, now isn't it? Now it should be noted that Liang's conviction was eventually reduced to criminally negligent homicide, he didn't serve any jail time, wasn't sentenced to any jail time. Jacobson: But I'm sure he lost his job. Proft: But that's secondary, it's secondary. The sentencing is secondary to the conviction, and then we can argue about the sentencing, but here in this case I would argue we have jury nullification based on the politics of immigration policy. And speaking of the politics of immigration policy, of course this matters in the state of Illinois, which is a Sanctuary State, and the county of Cook, which is a Sanctuary County, and the city of Chicago, which is a Sanctuary City, and we have a number of cases here where families have been victimized by people in this country illegally, and justice has yet to be served. We mentioned the Tiffany Thrasher case in Straumburg on Friday, and that we mentioned that the individual responsible for her MURDER is, I believe, awaiting trial. And then we also have the case of Dennis McCann. Dennis McCann was killed in Chicago by an illegal immigrant who subsequently fled after arrest, because he was able to post bail. Jacobson: It was a hit and run on Kinzie Avenue, right? Proft: Right. We've spoken to his brother, Brian McCann, before, and Brian McCann joins us again now. Brian, thanks for joining us, appreciate it. McCann: Yeah, thank you. Glad to be here. Proft: So, I know you and some other family members from families who have been victimized by illegal immigrant criminals have started an organization, and I wonder what the discussion was among you and similarly situated people when that Steinle verdict came down last week? McCann: Yeah, well as I'm sure you can imagine, the phones were ringing, and emails were in process all weekend, with my fellow AVIACers...Advocates of Victims of Illegal Alien Crime. And what we're going to try to do is pivot off of this, and hopefully it will be seared into the consciousness of John and Mary Q Public. That's been our lament over the past few years, that most Americans are some sort of indifferent, perhaps even uncaring, certainly not AWARE of how serious the problem of illegal alien crime is. So we're gonna ratchet up our cause, we're gonna try to raise a few more bucks, and do some more travelling, and we thank you for inviting me, and other people are doing radio shows this morning as well. Jacobson: Brian, for those of us who aren't familiar, or maybe they missed out the first time we had you on, or they didn't read John Cass' column, your brother was hit by Saul Chavez, who was on a...just explain what happened that day. McCann: Yeah, it was June 6th, 2011. My brother was calling on a client at a Mexican restaurant, he's an insure...he's a commercial insurance guy. As he was crossing Kedzie Avenue, not far from that famous monument up there, he...Chavez was SERIOUSLY inebriated, and hit him, and dragged him about a city block, and my brother died a violent death. A good Samaritan, an off-duty cop, apprehended him, and Chavez was brought in. He was arraigned, and we were ASSURED by the Cook County Prosecutor not to worry about bail because of something called a detainer, which was explained to us at the time, so we were somewhat comforted that he would receive justice. Little did we know that soon to be the next Congressman, Chuy Garcia, was working tirelessly with Preckwinkle to fashion an ordinance to make the county Sanctuary, which it did in September of 2011, and Mr. Chavez's brother posted the necessary $25,000...in CASH, might I add, and Chavez fled and he's alive and well, driving a truck in Mexico. Proft: And so, I remember when we talked to you about the Sanctuary STATE legislation, to codify this policy that the city and county enacted at the state level, you and other families who've been victimized wanted to speak to the governor about it before he made his decision, ultimately which was to sign it. And the governor had publicly promised you, or I think he had promised you, that he would speak to you. And I wonder if that conversation ever happened. McCann: Never...never did. He promised...he promised us in front of, I don't know, about 20 million people, and Fox News that night, Bret Baier was in town...so I thought "Well, that should make for some leverage." But no, he never reached out to us. He did say that he talks to lots of families, but we suspect he talks more to families that are from the other side than to us. (inaudible) is trying to sue for documents on that, by the way, but I don't know if they'll ever get anywhere. They're trying. Proft: So the interesting thing about this, you suggest that you're trying to get families to pay attention to this, residents of Illinois to get animated by this, and in other states by the way. And when you look at the survey research, people WILDLY oppose this, I mean, Republicans, Democrats, this is like 3-to-1 AGAINST this policy. So people kind of viscerally get it, it may not be the kind of thing that animates them if they or someone they know hasn't been victimized, but they certainly get the logic of your position. And I wonder now if this is a time now because of that Steinle verdict to try and focus people's attention on their legislators, and put pressure on them to consider a repeal of the legislation Governor Rauner signed. McCann: Well, I talked to a young lady the other day, she's campaign manager for, I guess, Jeanne Ives? And I think she's gonna be on with you this morning, later on I think? So she wants me to join her on the steps of the jail, I think on Thursday, let me take a look at my notes. I guess she wants to announce a repeal effort, if she's elected Governor. And I certainly support that. Now, out in California, Don Rosenberg, who is part of our organization, he is raising money to try to do a ballot initiative. I don't think we can do ballot initiatives here, but they're... Proft: Not as easily, right. McCann: They're trying to do it out there, so lots of luck for Don! But, that could generate a lot of buzz too, because California's got more issues related to this than we do. Jacobson: But you must feel betrayed by Governor Rauner! The fact that he didn't call you, at first he said he would call you, and now we're a sanctuary STATE. McCann: I mean, I'm an old student of political science, I understand. Ironically, I was kind of PLEASED with what happened. You know, aside from immigration issues, I'm a big proponent of vouchers, in spite of the fact that I'm a retired public school teacher. When he slipped that tax credit voucher thing in there, privately I was pretty pleased with him. So it's mixed, politics is mixed, you never get what you want, but sure...betrayed? I don't know...I don't know how to respond, he...I'm a realist, I'm a realist. Proft: Yeah, you're used to Illinois Chicago politics, which is to say you're used to... McCann: Being around this town for so long, yknow... Jacobson: You just keep your expectations low? But I mean, your brother is GONE, he's not coming back, and his killer is alive and well down there in Mexico. Do you ever want to just go down there and take some street justice? McCann: Yeah, well...we're gonna start a posse. And I'm 70 years old, so I remember the old Westerns. I always wanted to start a posse when I was kid. Maybe we'll start one. You wanna join? Jacobson: Yeah! I'll be the Swedish member of your posse! Proft: Yeah, we'll get the Wild Bunch together, yeah! McCann: We'll have Poncho Vida on horseback, and we'll have a good time. Proft: Do you speak with other families? I know you mentioned your friend in California, what about other families in Illinois, do you... McCann: You know, you guys ought to...and I can send you the number...Eric Brady, he lost his wife Jeanine, New Year's Eve down in Champaign...Champaign, of all places, Champaign went sanctuary a few years ago. And Jeanine worked down at the American Legion, her husband's a veteran, and she was driving home New Year's Eve, on Interstate...what is it, 70, 74, down there? 74, she was on her way home, and this kid from Guatemala was on the wrong side of the Interstate and hit her head on and killed her instantly. The Guatemalan was rushed to the hospital, to see if he had any injuries, and the stupid Illinois state police didn't assign a deputy to him, so they released him that morning and he fled to Guatemala. I've had radio stations down in St Louis talk to Eric, you oughta talk to him, it's unbelievably tragic, very recent. Proft: And here's the thing about this to, to get your perspective, and I mean mine on this, I'm a pro-LEGAL-immigration guy, but it seems to me that all the politicians say, and the Steinle case is such a poignant reminder of this, "Yeah, people that are here that have committed violent crimes, obviously they have to be deported!" And yet, they're not. And they're deported...or they're deported...and they return time and time again and then find safe haven in cities like San Francisco or Chicago, and so it's very difficult to have a thoughtful conversation on how we govern legal immigration in this country when politicians across the political spectrum can't keep that sort of foundational promise to expel violent individuals who shouldn't be in this country in the first place. McCann: Yeah. Yeah I couldn't agree with you more, and how're we gonna resolve this? God only knows. The Democratic party, the progressives that run these cities...they're a different breed, they're a different coalition, and they're not the Roosevelt Democrats that my mother and father and my wife's family was. They're not real pro-labor, you know...I'm Irish! We wanted to run the cities. But we didn't want CRIMINALS. I don't know. We didn't want to protect criminals, and we didn't want to protect alternative marriage schemes, and all sorts of other...it's a different world out there, and somehow we have to punch through it and get people in middle America to appreciate that. I've seen that data you mentioned, Dan, but boy, when you're talking to the average man on the street, they think...Kate Steinle was an outlier, it was an isolated case. They really don't realize how SERIOUS this crime situation is. We...it's impossible to aggregate data BECAUSE of sanctuary cities. I mean, we get together with ICE but really we're doing it on our own, and there's been well over 200 murders, killings, in the last 12 years, these are some of our early figures, not to mention assaults, rapes, identity theft, you name it, all felonies. The public has got to get it! And we're praying and hoping that we can pivot off of this Steinle thing and change a few minds and maybe...get this repeal effort underway. And I'll talk to Miss Ives later this week, and hopefully I can help her. Proft: All right, Brian, we appreciate you raising the profile on the issue. He is Brian McCann, Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime, it's...how do you pronounce the acronym? McCann: AVIAC.US is the website, and we have a button, and we need some money, so please help. Proft: AVIAC.US is the website. McCann: AVIAC.US is the website. Proft: He is Brian McCann, Brian thank you so much for joining us. McCann: You bet guys, thank you so much.

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Is Conservative Reformer Jeanne Ives Challenging Left-Leaning Incumbent Bruce Rauner?

State Rep. Jeanne Ives announced she is ready to take on Rauner in the Republican primary for Governor. Ives says she believes GOP primary voters deserve a choice in the upcoming election. How would her campaign differ from Rauner’s failed “Turnaround Agenda?” State Representative and potential Republican candidate for Governor, Jeanne Ives joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Dan Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. So over the weekend, a couple of announcements. One, obviously it's not an election cycle in Illinois, Pat Quinn is not on the ballot, so he is...he's announced he's running for Attorney General. Amy Jacobson: That's so sweet! Proft: Yeah. Jacobson: Do you think he and Erika Harold will have a debate? They should. Proft: If he IS the Democrat Party's nominee...that's an if. Jacobson: Well what other, lot of other...oh yes, there's other challengers. Proft: There's like ten candidates on their side for Attorney General, since they've all been pent up waiting for almost two decades for "Daddy's Little Girl" to step down, Lisa Maddigan. So, and I think Erika Harold has a very good shot to win that race. Jacobson: Oh, so do I! Proft: So that's Quinn, and the other development is... Jacobson: The BIGGER news, Dan. Proft: Well, there's a revolt going on within the Republican party, and a lot of people want to see Bruce Rauner challenged in the primary, so that the race doesn't come down to, well, two big government plutocrats. Not much of a choice. They want distinguishing brand, and a candidate who can provide a distinguishing brand. And so rumors, we've talked about it on this show for a while, that State Representative Jeanne Ives, Republican from Wheaton, who I supported in previous campaigns as a private citizen through my political activities, in the interest of full disclosure, that she is circulating petitions to challenge Governor Rauner in the Republican primary. She added her running mate over the weekend, which is required. He is Rich Morthland, who is a former state rep and county board member, and now a community college professor at Black Hawk College, down in the Quad Cities area. And so, let's find out more about this fledgeling campaign, Jeanne and her running mate's. State representative Jeanne Ives joins us now, Jeanne, thanks for being with us, appreciate it. Jeanne Ives: Dan, great to talk to you today! Proft: So, what was the decision to take this next step and circulate petitions to get on the ballot and be a candidate against Governor Rauner? Ives: Well, GOP Primary votes, they really deserve a choice, and you know, they can choose between big government run by wealthy class, or they can pick the conservative reform ticket. Families and businesses are getting lied to and hurt by the policies in Springfield, and I know that firsthand. So we're going to take on this challenge, and we're going to do it with integrity, and we're going to be honest with the people in Illinois. Jacobson: Well when you talk about politics, you also talk about money, and Governor Rauner, I mean...that is a juggernaut to go against, because he's going to use $50 million of his own money in his re-election campaign. Can you even get a fourth of that money raised? Ives: We're very confident that we can raise that level of money. You know, we've already had a really good positive response from people. Nobody is saying that I shouldn't win. Everybody is agreeing with my policy prescriptions, and what I stand for, and they're looking for somebody who's going to be honest with them, and I'll tell you what...Governor Rauner can spend most of his fortune, and it's unlikely that he can redeem his reputation with GOP Primary voters. Proft: Well that's the thing, isn't it? It's a challenge for you to get known, because you are one of 118 state reps, so people outside of your district probably don't know you as well, you don't get a lot of profile as a state rep around the state, generally speaking. But, Rauner is a known quantity. And that's a quantity that Republican primary voters are revolting against because of his policy decisions. The guy that said "I wasn't going to have a social agenda" has had nothing except a social agenda three years in. And so it seems to me that's the challenge, getting better known, so people understand the choice before them. So, in the interest of getting better known, give us a bit of the background on you, and your family, so people get a better handle on who you are, and what you're trying to do. Ives: Sure, that's great! I actually grew up in Vermillion, South Dakota, and went to West Point, and I received a Bachelor of Science in Economics from there, served six years in the Army, my last assignment was ROTC at Wheaton College. I left them to raise my family, five children with my husband Paul, here in Wheaton. And I've got to tell you, the best compliment I ever got in my life came from Mr. Catchton, who I know you know, Dan, as well. Proft: The longtime gym teacher at St. Michaels... Ives: Yeah, gym teacher, long time. And you know what he said to me? He said, "You know what, Mrs. Ives? You've raised a solid citizen there," when he saw my son Matt. And I thought, you know, that is the best thing that you can do, is to raise solid citizens, and make them a part of society, productive parts of society. And so I've spent my time raising my children, doing some volunteer work, tax and accounting work on the side, and then I ran for state rep after serving on the Wheaton City Council. So, that's kind of who I am and a little bit about my background... Proft: And your husband, Paul...also West Point? Ives: Yes, my husband Paul is a "West Pointer", and our son Nick graduated from West Point. But Nick's a contrarian, so he cross-commissioned to the Navy, and he's going to be a Navy pilot. Jacobson: And you still talk to him... Proft: So one of your sons, *laughs* yeah, right, you still talk to him... Jacobson: I'm so sorry... Ives: *laughing* Yes, we still talk to him, and he does still root for West Point in the Army-Navy game, so that's good too. Jacobson: See, that's all that matters. Proft: Yeah, that's really, the Army-Navy game. That's the dividing line. So one son is in the Navy, and the other is...don't you have another son that's an Army Ranger? Ives: So Matt is stationed up in Fort Wainright, Alaska, and he is an Army Infantry Officer. He graduated ROTC from University of Illinois with a degree in Electrical Engineering, and he also earned his Ranger tab. So we're really proud of Matt, he's moving into an executive officer position up there, in the Striker battalion. Jacobson: That's great. Now, have you heard from Governor Rauner or anyone in his camp? Have they tried to persuade you not to run? Because I know there's been rumblings for a while that you might challenge him. Ives: No, they have not reached out to me at all, and you know, we don't expect them to reach out to us at all. But, I tell you what, this isn't just one decision that he made on one vote or one particular bill. This is a series of really, I think, bad decisions, that feeds into the "crony capitalism" problem we already have in the state of Illinois. And, the other thing that I'm kind of concerned about is, you know...public corruption is literally an everyday occurance in the state of Illinois. And we have a culture of corruption in this state, and officials overlook it repeatedly, and we need to detect it and prevent it and we need to prosecute it. And as the executive of the state, I really think that he has failed to take on that critical issue. Proft: Tell us about your running mate, just kind of filling in the blanks here, Rich Morthland, who I know as well. Former state rep from the Quad Cities area, a little bit on him and why you chose him to run with you. Ives: Well I think, you know, the reason that I chose RIch is that he actually embodies exactly what Illinois is, in many ways. We are a farm state, and people forget that. Well first and foremost, Rich is a farmer. And I think it's important to have somebody like that, with that kind of background, in on policy decisions that are important to the entire state. And he comes from Rock Island County, which is a county that has been decimated in terms of jobs and economic opportunity, and they're getting out-competed by Iowa. And many citizens are moving across the border to Iowa. So we need his perspective state-wide on what's going on. You know, Illinois is more than just the suburbs and the city of Chicago. And Rich is a man of integrity, he served honorably in the State House, he's a community college professor, and he's in the union by the way, so we're real excited to have both Rich and his wife Betsy, who's just a fireball, on our team, and we think we're going to resonate with everybody. Jacobson: Now, besides big names, big name Republicans such as Dan Proft... Proft: *sarcastically* Oh, yeah... Jacobson: ...are others supporting you on your...well we had Congressman Peter Roskam on our program on Friday, and he seemed very open to the possibility that you would run for Governor. Ives: Peter is a close friend of mine, in fact I'm his state rep, so I'm thrilled to have the support of prominent Republicans like Peter. And actually, you know...GOP voters deserve a choice. It's going to be up to the GOP Primary voters to put a good team in like Rich and I vs the Plutocratic choices you have between Pritzker and Rauner. Proft: Well now, you're going to have people who heard the line before about pursuing a conservative reform agenda, that's what Rauner said, and it didn't happen. So, kind of the "once bitten", or in Illinois' case, "a hundred times bitten, a hundred and first time shy". So why is it going to be different with Jeanne Ives than it has been with Rauner and so many other Republicans? Ives: Well, we're going to take a different tactic when we put in policy. We're going to hyper-focus on what we need to do, and make sure Illinoisans understand how desperately we need job creation, and need to become business-friendly. Because I know firsthand that the taxpayers and businesses are the last consideration in any conversation down in Springfield. So, we elected Governor Rauner, literally, he was also elected to be the backstop for any bad policies coming out of the legislature. And he has failed that in many ways, from bailing out multibillion dollar companies, to bailing out CPS on the backs of taxpayers statewide. We elected him to do something differently. He could have turned the conversation, and put his voice in many of those critical meetings, and he failed to do so. So look, we have, both Rich and I, have a policy background, and we understand exactly the game that's going on, and we're going to insert ourselves in those conversations, and make sure that taxpayers are heard, and not just lobbyists and special interests. Proft: Well, I suppose also you have a voting record, as does Rich. So you can compare and contrast your voting record with the choices that Rauner made on so many of these issues that have angered Republican Primary voters, from HB-40, to Sanctuary State, to trans birth certificate, to the crony capitalist legislation that you were one of the few to reject. So those are opportunities for contrast to kind of establish credibility, I suppose. Ives: I'm happy to put my voting record out in the public for them to see, because in many cases most of the legislation that's run down from Springfield...you couldn't sell it to anybody if people understood what the bill did. You could only sell it to a group that's sitting in a bubble, like Springfield. Nobody else would agree that most of the policy that has passed is good at all. You know, there's very little thought going into much of the legislation, very little research and analysis. So not only am I proud of my voting record, I'm proud of the bills that I actually pushed, that I actually filed, that didn't come to fruition, because it tells you where I went and where I'm going. And it's ALL taxpayer protection. From limiting the debt that is accumulating in our municipalities, in our schools, on the backs of our children, in the future years, to pension reform that we have to have. So, my record is wide open and I'm happy to send it. Jacobson: So, are you going to start travelling around the state, getting to know some people, in the southern counties? Proft: Like Mount Prospect...the Jacobson Ancestral Home... Ives: I'm thrilled...my calendar is filling up quickly, and our team is ready to do all the work and meet all the people that we need to be successful. And I've already been invited to events around the state, so we have a broad base of support already, and that just excites our team. Proft: You said something at the outset that I just kind of wanted to pick up on. The people that you're talking to, nobody's saying that you shouldn't win. Because you're going to run up against conventional wisdom that says, "Oh, she can't win! Rauner's money, and nobody knows who she is." I mean, this is of course the easy analysis, this why people take it, because it's the easy analysis and we're content to be prognosticators so much of the time rather than work for what we WANT to see happen, it's easier just to predict what will happen. But how do you run into, or...how do you respond to that conventional wisdom that's tinged with a healthy dose of fatalism about the party and the state? Ives: Well I have a lot of trust in the majority of the voters in the state of Illinois. And I think overall, Illinoisans are still very much practical mid-westerners. And while this looks like a David vs. Goliath race, and maybe it is right now in terms of money, a better story really is "The Emperor's New Clothes". So we're going to expose the fact that they have literally no clothes on...on much of their policies. And I think that when you're confronted with the truth about what's going on in Springfield, the voters will turn away from that, and actually vote for somebody who they know has a backbone, who is going to stand up for them. So that's our challenge, we have to get the money and the resources to get that message out, but we're confident once people hear our message, it will resonate with them. Proft: I don't like thinking about the Rauners with no clothes on. Jacobson: *quietly* Oh dear... Proft: So I don't know if I like that metaphor. But otherwise, I of course like what Jeanne Ives has to say. State representative Jeanne Ives, Republican candidate for governor in the making, in the making, of course there's the caveat there, she's gotta file by December 4th, still a decision to make. Jeanne, thanks for joining us, appreciate it. Ives: Good day, thank you for having me!

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