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black lives matter

Fight For Border Wall Continues

What is the legal analysis of Trump's veto message and the humanitarian crisis at the border? Is Trump changing the culture of crime? Is restoring a meritocracy the remedy for the college admissions’ process? Writer at the Powerlineblog.com, John Hinderaker joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Deifying Diversity

Are pro-lifers no longer welcome at Wheaton College? Why aren’t College Republicans able to express themselves and their perspective the same way a few members of the faculty and student government are able to? What’s the argument against the importance of “black lives matter” inside and outside of the womb? Founder of the Radiance Foundation, Ryan Bomberger joins Dan and Amy to discuss his experience at Wheaton College.

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Feel Good Idealism Leaving People Worse Off

If the Left has only hate to offer, what should conservatives offer in response? Is the need for liberalism becoming obsolete? Does America not give itself enough credit for its moral evolution? Are school choice programs giving Republicans an advantage in governors’ races in states like Florida and Arizona? Author and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Shelby Steele joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Wanted: Fathers And Effective Policing

Will anything change in Chicago until men are expected to marry the mother of their children and take responsibility? Why is the completely unnecessary consent decree diverting away more resources to hire new cops? What is another way CPD could rebuild trust and present a counter narrative to the rhetoric from Black Lives Matter? Contributing Editor for City Journal and author of “The War on Cops,” Heather MacDonald joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Social Justice Warrior “Reform” Plan For CPD

Chicago FOP President Kevin Graham on proposed consent decree: “if imposed in current form, the city will be less safe.” Is it really important for Chicago police to get personal pronouns correct when arresting felons? What is next, disarming the CPD? President of the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police Kevin Graham joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Black Lives Matter Discredited Their Legitimacy

Main problems with the Black Lives Matter movement: shut down conversation at universities and failed to address black on black crime, while alienating police officers in the black community. Is Black Lives Matter any different than other cultural Marxists groups? DePaul Philosophy Professor, Dr. Jason Hill joins Dan and Amy to discuss his new book “We Have Overcome,” which he describes as a love letter to the American people.

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Was Desegregation Successful In Remedying Inequality?

Is inequality exacerbated by liberals not a black vs. white issue but an ideological battle between freedom and socialism? Can we still blame 50 years of racism for everything? Is Farrakhan off limits for the DC press corps? NFL All-Pro Burgess Owens joins Dan and Amy to discuss racial politics.

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Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. Amy, this story comes to us from Campus Reform. University of Minnesota has invited the distinguished anthropology professor from Beloit College, one Lisa Anderson Levy, to have a grown-up conversation about whiteness on campus. "How whiteness is an existential threat to the United States." She argues that "whiteness is violence". What are we going to do with the white people, then, if the very act of being white is violence, (Jacobson: More shaming...) intrinsically violent. We're going to have to do something with these white people, I wonder what these deep thinkers in the hallowed halls of academia have in mind. Jason Riley, our friend from the Wall Street Journal, has a good op-ed over the weekend, "Fifty Years of Blaming Everything on Racism", and he actually dates back to former Illinois Governor Otto Kerner, and like most former Governors, he went to prison...who provided the Commission on Civil Disorders report fifty years ago last month, 1968. The report blamed urban unrest, black urban unrest, on white racism, segregation, official neglect, all that were meant to explain the racial inequality, and racial inequality that persists today, because that's the argument that continues to be made. The Kerner reports most famous assertion was that the US was moving towards two societies, one black one white, separate and unequal, and desegregation, essentially, was not successful in remedying the inequalities. So, where does that leave us in 2018, 50 years after the Kerner report? Well, to help us answer that question, we're pleased to be joined again by Burgess Owens, who first and foremost, former NFL All-Pro-er, Super Bowl Champion, 1980 Oakland Raiders, don't you forget it! He's also the author of "Liberalism, or How to Turn Good Men into Whiners, Weenies, and Wimps", which is one of the best book titles I've ever heard. Burgess Owens, thanks for joining us again, appreciate it. Owens: Dan and Amy, I'm looking (?) again, absolutely. Proft: So, what about the assertions that were made in a Jason Riley...by Jason Riley, and his piece in the Wall Street Journal about fifty years of blaming everything on racism, and it's sort of just freezing time, taking the findings of the Kerner report, and making the same arguments despite a lot of changes that have occurred over that 50 years. Owens: Well, first of all, Jason's article is spot-on, as are most of the black conservatives out there that understand living our history. What I can't emphasize enough when we have this conversation is that we're in a fight for the heart and soul of our nation, and it is not black and white, as the Left would like us to believe. It's Judeo-Christian values, and pride in our history, and understanding our history, versus the Marxist Socialism and Atheism, which would love to...would love to divide us, and (?) our history is all about. And there's a really quick backdrop to this whole thing about whiteness; I've never seen this bold racism that is actually being promoted and accepted by both blacks and whites who would love to divide us. For those who want to apologize for our past background and history...let me suggest that you DO a little history, do a little study, Google a little bit, and understand our country is the greatest in the history of mankind because of what was done together, and as individual cultures, what we've done. The black community, in the 40s 50s and 60s, early 60s, led our nation in terms of the growth of our middle class, led our nation in terms of men committed to (?) with 7%, led our nation in terms of entrepreneurs, 40%, led our nation in terms of men committed to higher education. So it's not that we, by the color of our skin, cannot produce, compete, or win, it's policies. It's Democratic, Marxist, Socialist policies that's been put into our community, that's allowed misery to be a strategy, a policy. And you've seen it in Detroit, Chicago, Baltimore, Ferguson, any places Leftists run and rule and reign, you see misery. So, don't blame us on the color of our skin, blame the policies that are put together by the....ideology that hates our nation. Jacobson: So, Mr. Owens...how do you feel when you see a "Black Lives Matter" sign? Owens: Well, what I recognize, because I just had a chance to experience it for myself last week...understand about Marxists and Socialists...they're bullies, they're not there to try and find solutions, they're trying to silence...the person will talk about their "Safe Space", and you're taking away everyone's "Safe Space". At the end of the day, how we win the nation is we debate, we talk, we educate ourselves. We sit down and try to figure out solutions, even though we might not agree on everything, we have a common goal, which is "how do we improve our nation? How do we improve our races, how do we improve our people?" If that is the goal of our nation, and we have the right focus, we'll come up with the right solutions. Unfortunately, with Socialists, it's always class over race, class over country, and so you're never going to have solutions from these "Black Lives Matter" people. First of all, they've not been educated, they've been turned into little Marxists, and so they're not gonna come up with a lot of answers, they're gonna come up with a lot of anger, pointing fingers, and asking for excuses or apologies. Proft: How do you react to the apparently relatively close, and continuingly close associations between a bunch of members of the Black Democrat...members of the Black Caucus in Congress and Louis Farrakhan and the media's effort to basically IGNORE this story, even as we find Keith Ellison, Deputy Director of the DNC, Deputy Chairman of the DNC, lying about his continuing relationship with Minister Farrakhan, including as confirmed by a fellow Farrakhan friend, Andre Carson of Indiana. So you basically have these eight legislators, all the members of the Black Caucus, as well as some organizers of these women's marches, these peahat marches and so forth, that are basically running cover for Louis Farrakhan's virulent anti-Semitism. Owens: Well, understand again...let's start off by talking about the fact that it's not a black or white issue, it's truly an ideology, that we're fighting for the soul of our nation. One thing about the Black Caucus, and I need to make this very very clear...we've had, in our race, a fight against white supremacists. They have not been able to do a thing to get us focused, motivated, and winning. That's what happens when we look up to those guys. The greatest threat that we have as a race are these black leaders. It's the Black Congressional Caucus, these Marxists who vote every time against the targets of our race, they sit and they live a (?) life. So that's the first thing. First of all, I don't expect much from the Black Congressional Caucus, they haven't done much of anything in 50 years, and they never will. The other part of it is I'm asking...where are the black Christian leaders? We have our race being turned into racists, while we sit back and watch it happen, sadly. Those of us who believe there's a God in Heaven, believe in Jesus Christ, that are Christians, who are supposed to put our faith before anything else...it's time for us to stand up and man up. We have our people, our young people, being turned into racists by people like Farrakhan and other racist people. One thing I could say is, if you look down South...racist people are not very HAPPY people, and the worst thing that we could do is become one of them. So I'm very disappointed in the "black ministry", quote, that did so well in the 1800s, early 1900s, standing up for our race...they're not doing that (today), they're failing that big time. So either leave the pulpit, or find your guts and let's stand up and man up for the right thing, and tell our people where we find our truth and our happiness, and it's not following people like Farrakhan. Jacobson: For those of us who don't remember your background and what brought you to Conservatism, was there something in particular that happened? Owens: Yeah, well actually I look down South, and I believe that the core of our race is a conservative base, most black Americans believe...have a conservative foundation. But, we've been trained and radical...or, trained to vote for Democrats. I was one of them, in college I voted for Democrats, Jimmy Carter, but what happened was I left the NFL and got into business for myself, and I failed many times. And I began to realize, this is the ONE place where you can start all over again. This is a place of hope and dreams, we have...you can develop a network of people, black white, it doesn't matter what the colors are, and everyone will help you, as long as you're doing your best, and trying to bring value to the plate. So, I realized that we have a party that has been anti-black from the very beginning, they're Socialists, (?), slavery, and everything you can think of that has been against our race, the Democratic party has been the genesis of that. So, when I realized that, I became a Conservative, and now I'm one with a big, large, capital C, to say the least. I love our country, I love the values that our Judeo-Christian traditions brought to us, and I think as we focus on that as a people, what we the people (have) done, the latter 200 years of history has been remarkable, and if we get back to that we can win the fight against these evil ideological Socialism Marxists. Proft: I want to just punctuate something that you're talking about. You mentioned with the great black entrepreneurs of the 60s representing 40% of the entrepreneurship of the time, you talked about your career as a successful businessman. And I was on a panel discussion here in Chicago recently, and they had a black Alderman, a black columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times...and their only answer to the highest black unemployment rate, the highest black YOUTH unemployment rate in the country here in Chicago, was just...one answer was just to say "Jobs jobs jobs!" as much as she could in the time allotted. The other, the politician's answer was to say we need a Marshall Plan for the urban center, so it's kind of more government spending, and so I just want to kind of get to your message to young people, to people who have not been availed of opportunities in urban centers like Chicago, and the message they always get from the Left is "Government is gonna come in and spend money on you, spend money on your community, and that's your path out." And I think you're saying something very different. Owens: Dan, that's a good...that's a well-formulated question. First of all, the 40% that we used to be when I was coming through is down to 3.8%. It is not because of anything except Democratic policies. Davis-Bacon Act back in 1932, the minimum wage, all these things that keep our young people...and the messaging! We're not telling our kids that you need to have your own business, and we don't educate...75% of blacks born in California cannot pass a standard reading-writing test, that is as of last year. These kids cannot even start to THINK outside the box if you're not educating them. So the problem is that we have an elitist group of people, Aldermans, Democrats, that could care less about solutions. So my suggestion is very simple, we start with this; first of all, tell our kids "If I can do it, you can do it!" My greatest occupation, of all the things I've done, football player, obviously, corporate environment...my greatest was being a CHIMNEY SWEEP when my business failed back in 1990. I did it for three months, because I was willing to do whatever it took, and that's what our young people need to hear. Whatever it takes, get back up, man up, do whatever you need to do, educate yourself and dream big. Because if you do that, good things will come your way, because that's just the way it is. We have a God in Heaven who blesses us if we try to do our very best, and do it honestly. If we tell our kids that, they will begin to realize that these Democrats are the worst thing that has happened to us...since the KKK. Matter of fact, the KKK only lynched 4K people. The Democrats have killed over 20M of our black kids. So we have ourselves a problem. We need to wake up, and see who our enemy is, and it's not a black or white issue. It's ideology, Marxist racist...no, it's Marxist, Socialist, and...and...and...what is it...oh yes, it's Atheist. Proft: He is Burgess Owens, former NFL All-Pro for the Oakland...AND Super Bowl Champion with the Oakland Raiders, a successful businessman, chimney sweeper!...and author now, "Liberalism, or How to Turn Good Men into Whiners, Weenies, and Wimps". Burgess, thanks so much for joining us again, appreciate it. Owens: Thank you, keep up the good work, let's do it again. Take care. Proft: Take care. Jacobson: ...and he played for the Jets...AND he joined us on our Turnkey Dot Pro Answer Line.

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MLK: Man Of Peace And Civil Discourse

“The civil rights struggle for black Americans is over and has been won.” Although the constitutional rights’ battle has been won, what strategies are there to overcome the problems that are still relevant today in the black community? Do those who lived through times of true discrimination appreciate the progress that has been made more than younger generations who try to equate it with the hardships they face today? Professor of Economics at George Mason University and syndicated columnist, Walter Williams joins Dan and Amy to discuss race relations nearly 50 years after Martin Luther King’s assassination.

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Proft: Dan and Amy...of course memorializing Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday today, this 2018, a couple of months away from the 50th anniversary of his assassination, April 4th, 1968. And so, I can't play some of these clips enough. They're just so great, who talks like this anymore? I wish people did...Martin Luther King, in one of my favorite speeches, the Streetsweeper Speech, he gave here in Chicago at New Covenant Church about...almost exactly a year before his assassination. King (from tape): What I'm saying to you today, my friends, even if it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures, sweep streets like Handel and Beethoven composed music. Sweep streets like Shakespeare wrote poetry. Sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will have to pause and say: Here lived a great street sweeper who swept his job well. If you can't be a pine at the top of the hill, be a scrub in the valley. Be be the best little scrub on the side of the hill. Be a bush if you can't be a tree. If you can't be a highway, just be a trail. If you can't be the sun, be a star. For it isn't by size that you win or fail. Be the best of whatever you are. Proft: I mean that...HE writes poetry like Shakespeare. In addition to that, just this other clip, because I think it's relevant to our discussion today. This is the speech he gave at the Mason Temple in Memphis the night before he was assassinated. Rather prophetic speech, this is the "On the Mountaintop" speech...not gonna play that part. The part in the beginning, where he essentially holds America's stated values up against...up for display, and says are we living up...are people living up to these values, as enshrined in our founding documents. Of course the answer was no, but can we do that today? Can we honestly do the mirror test that Martin Luther King put to us in 1968? King (from tape): All we say to America is, "Be true to what you said on paper." If I lived in China or even Russia, or any totalitarian country, maybe I could understand some of these illegal injunctions. Maybe I could understand the denial of certain basic First Amendment privileges, because they hadn't committed themselves to that over there. But somewhere I read of the freedom of assembly. Somewhere I read of the freedom of speech. Somewhere I read of the freedom of press. Somewhere I read that the greatness of America is the right to protest for right. Proft: Now we're pleased to be joined by somebody who was there, generally speaking, during that period. He is another great, the great Walter Williams. His Eminence of Economics at George Mason University, Professor Williams, thanks again for joining us, appreciate it. Williams: Hey, good morning! Proft: Good morning. And so, some of your contemporaries opined today, on the occasion of Martin Luther King's birthday. One of them is Shelby Steele, who had a piece in the Wall Street Journal over the weekend, and he said this; "The oppression of black people is over with. It's politically incorrect news, but it's true nonetheless. We blacks are today a free people. It's as if freedom sneaked up and caught us by surprise." He goes on to say "We can say that past oppression left us unprepared for freedom, this is certainly true, but this is no consolation. Freedom is just freedom. It's a condition, not an agent of change. It doesn't develop or uplift people who win it, freedom holds us accountable no matter the disadvantages we inherit from the past." Is Shelby Steele right about that? Williams: I think he's absolutely right, and that's something I've said for years, that the civil rights struggle for black Americans in our country is over, and it has been won. That is, at one time black Americans did not have the Constitutional guarantees of others in our country. Today, we do. Now, because the civil rights struggle is over and won, that does not mean there are not MAJOR problems confronting the black community, such as education, crime, and family breakdown. These are major problems, but these are not civil rights problems. That is, they will not be solved by using civil rights strategies. That is...you can sing "We Shall Overcome" all you want, but if blacks are murdering each other, as they are doing in great numbers, in your country...in your city, and getting a fraudulent education, a grossly fraudulent education where the average black 12th grader, he can read and write at the level of the average white 6th or 7th or 8th grader. Now, that's a MAJOR problem...but it's a not a civil rights problem! That is...you take the city of Baltimore, that's a city that's run...that blacks have been mayors, Chief of Police, Superintendent of Schools, most of the members of the City Council, and but yet, this fraudulent education goes on! And that's true in many cities, but it's not civil rights problems. Let me...it doesn't have anything to do with racial discrimination. And so I think that Dr. King's legacy, his battle that he fought, is over and won, but we still have major problems that remain. Jacobson: What do you think Martin Luther King Jr. would think of the "Black Lives Matter" movement and of Antifa? Williams: Well I think that he would look at it with a great disgust, he was a man of peace, he was against the advocation of violence. As a matter of fact, during his life he had an ongoing battle with the Black Muslims, because they were more for using violence and confrontation. So yes, I think he would be against this Antifa and the "Black Lives Matter". Proft: And Bob Woodson, another contemporary, writing in The Hill about how to truly honor the legacy of Dr. King, says among other things; "The noble struggle for equal rights has morphed into a race-grievance industry." I think that's a little bit what you're speaking of. And the sad thing to me is that it afflicts even some of what are actually heroes of the civil right movement, like Congressman John Lewis of Georgia, who has bought into the race grievance industry as Bob Woodson describes it. Williams: That is absolutely right, and if we continue to look at it as racial discrimination problems, the problems are going to remain forever. That is...the fact that 75% of black births are births out of wedlock, which is devastating to the black family structure and black welfare, and if you want to consider that a civil rights problem, then the problem's going to exist forever. You're gonna...the black people in Chicago and many other cities, they're not putting bars in their windows, huddled in their homes at night. They're not afraid of the Ku Klux Klan riding through! And so...but they're afraid of other black people. And if you say "Well gee, we have to do something about the Ku Klux Klan!", well, black people are gonna be in danger forever! Jacobson: Well we all aspire for racial harmony, but when President Trump makes the comments about people coming from "blank-hole countries", does that take us a step back, or where does that leave us? Williams: Well that's...if I were the President, I wouldn't use such language. But the point that he's making about, if you ask the question about people coming to our country illegally...I mean just ask yourself the question...how many Norwegians are coming to our country illegally and crowding up our jails? How many people from Finland? How many people from New Zealand? That's...those people coming to our country are not our problem. People coming from South America and Latin America and Africa and the Middle East, those people are the problems! Now, the President could have used different language, but he surely could have...he was right on the spot when he's talking about the kind of people who we're admitting into our country who are causing us major problems. Now it's not politically correct to talk the way I am, but it's factual, that is I've asked you, how many...and I gave the case of Norwegians, Finns, and New Zealanders, and others, how many of them causing problems, burning our welfare system? Proft: And the point you're getting to, and I think President Trump was trying to get to, is the point about a merit-based immigration system. It's not that we should exclude people from Haiti, or San Salvador, or Sub-Saharan Africa or anywhere else, but the question is what's the standard by which we're admitting people, regardless of their country of origin? And the standard should be merit-based, that they're going to contribute to this country, as opposed to being a detriment to this country in some material way, right? Williams: That is absolutely right. And the problem is made even worse by politicians in our country setting up Sanctuary Cities for people who are in our country illegally. If you ask them, I mean I think someone should ask the mayor of Chicago, would he set up a Sanctuary City for shoplifters, Sanctuary City for car thieves? And somebody's, if they stole a car or they shoplift, you just pay some kind of fine and they be on their way, and we'll take care of them anyway. Proft: Is it your experience, since you've lived through some terrible periods in our country's history in a way that I certainly haven't, is it your experience that once you get beyond the politicians demagoguing identity politics, whether it's based on race or gender, that in terms of the interaction between human beings on a daily basis, things are actually pretty good, racial harmony-wise, but not that you don't have some bad actors, some racists, of course you do, you always will, but things are generally pretty good, much different than they were 50 years ago and there should be some recognition of that, and that people shouldn't be falling for the siren song of, you know, political demagogues who want to score points for themselves by fanning these flames? Williams: Yeah, I think you're absolutely right. My next birthday, which will be in March, I'll be 82 years old. And I have lived through...and when I was in the Army I was sent down to Georgia, I lived through a lot of the discrimination. But one of the things that we Americans do not appreciate is that...the great progress that black Americans have made. Now for example, if you just added up the income that black Americans make each year, and just thought of us as an independent country with our own GDP, black Americans would constitute the 16th or 17th richest country on the face of this Earth. There are some black people who make a lot of money, millionaires, many blacks are some of the world's most famous personalities. And it was a black, in the name of Colin Powell, that headed the world's mightiest military. Now, the significance of all this is that in 1865, neither a slave nor a slave owner would have believed that this kind of progress would be possible in a mere one hundred years...or so. And as such, it speaks to the intestinal fortitude of the people, but just as importantly, it speaks to the greatness of a nation. That is, that those kind of achievements that black Americans have made could not have been achieved anywhere else on the face of this Earth. Now, what...now the problem that remains is how can we get the 30 or 35% of black Americans for whom these gains have been elusive, how can we bring them into the mainstream American society? That's the big question, and we won't get at it, we won't reach a solution, by looking at racial discrimination. Proft: He is Walter Williams, a great professor of Economics at George Mason University, also nationally syndicated columnist. The website, again, for your musings, Professor Williams, is? Williams: It's WalterEWilliams.com, WalterEWilliams.com. Proft: Professor Williams, thanks so much for joining us, appreciate it. Williams: And thank you for inviting me. Goodbye.

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University Protests: Activism or Antipathy?

Does the election of a President some find controversial, give protestors the right to resort to more aggressive tactics to make their point? One University of Chicago student thinks so. 

Kathleen Murphy, Dir. of Communications, Illinois Opportunity Project, headed to campus to see if his peers could "Follow The Logic". 

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