`

familyvalues

Support Group For Parents Of Transgender Children

What’s the common thread amongst children who all of a sudden identify as transgender? Why do schools celebrate it instead of questioning it and leaving parents in the dark? How important is it for parents to know they aren’t alone out there and there are other parents who are going through the same thing with their children? Jay Keck, a suburban Chicago resident, is a member of a support group for parents' who have children suddenly identifying as transgender. He joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

Related Content

Putting Family First

Has society been not only feminizing men, but also masculating women? Should parents be choosing their job over their children? Is missing most of your child's life in pursuit of a successful career worthwhile? Dan and Amy discuss the article, “America Needs a Family First Movement."

Related Content

Dan Proft’s Parenting Tips

What are the questions you have to ask yourself before you have kids? Should you have kids based on the political climate at the time? Should you prepare your child for the road or prepare the road for your child? Dan and Amy discuss.

Related Content

America’s Shrinking Moral Compass

Was Pastor Brunson’s prayer with President Trump a refreshing expression of faith rarely seen in today’s politics? Is there a fear of growing cynicism in the country? Why are cases of sexual assault seen as a public relations issue? Why are men and women on the left suggesting men should “take one for the team” and not fight back when they’re falsely accused of sexual assault? President of The Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, Dr. Russell Moore joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

Related Content

Wanted: Fathers And Effective Policing

Will anything change in Chicago until men are expected to marry the mother of their children and take responsibility? Why is the completely unnecessary consent decree diverting away more resources to hire new cops? What is another way CPD could rebuild trust and present a counter narrative to the rhetoric from Black Lives Matter? Contributing Editor for City Journal and author of “The War on Cops,” Heather MacDonald joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

Related Content

Common Characteristic Of Deadliest Mass Shooters In The US: Fatherlessness

Immediate safety in schools is the first issue legislators are tackling but what is the root of the violence? How is a young boy able to channel his masculinity if he’s in a female dominated home? Did welfare state policies finance the father out of the family? Cultural critic and author, Suzanne Venker joins Dan and Amy to discuss the consequences of the traditional family breakdown.

Related Content

Is "Toxic Masculinity" The Problem?

How are boys supposed to know what it means to be a man when pop culture celebrates sexual harassment and disrespect? Can boys not be men when society is telling them gender doesn’t matter? In the case of mass shooters, is one of the common threads the lack of socialization of the shooter or their failure of instruction of what it means to be a man? Dr. Leonard Sax, author of “Why Gender Matters,” joins Dan and Amy to explain why gender matters.

Related Content

Faith And Family Are The Restraints On Government

Did we see a shift to faith and family rather than Trump positioning himself as the strong leader? Did his speech focus on the collective strength of individuals and their communities instead of the “central state?” Has there ever been a more powerful moment at the SOTU than the young man from North Korea raising his crutches as a symbol of freedom? Senior political columnist at the Washington Examiner, Tim Carney joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

View full transcript


Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. President Trump's rather remarkable and story-filled State of the Union speech last night...I want to get to some of the individuals he highlighted, heroes and victims, the stories that were told, poignant and inspiring. But there was one comment that he made that probably won't get picked up much by the DC Press Corps, because they wouldn't even understand the point of it. And I don't know if Trump totally internalizes it either, but it's important to hear the President say it. And this was "New American Moment" portion of the speech, there was something very important that he said that I wanted to pick up on, it isn't said enough, it isn't recognized enough by politicians or people in positions of power in government. Trump on the New American Moment, see if you can pick up on what I'm referencing. Trump (from tape): This in fact is our new American moment. There has never been a better time to start living the American Dream. So to every citizen at home watching tonight...no matter where you've been, or where you've come from, this is your time. If you work hard, if you believe in yourself, if you believe in America, then you can dream anything, you can be *glitch, presumably "anything"), and together, we can achieve absolutely anything. *standing ovation* Tonight, I want to talk about what kind of future we're going to have, and what kind of a nation we're going to be. All of us, together as one people, one team, one American family, can do anything. We all share the same home, the same heart, the same destiny, and the same great American flag. *standing ovation* Together we are rediscovering the American way. In America we know that faith and family, not government and bureaucracy, are the center of American life. The motto is "IN GOD WE TRUST"! Proft: So the DC Press Corps will pick up on the first 90 seconds of that, where he makes the play for unity, which he's done before. But the key statement he made the entire night...the key statement that came from the President...was that faith and family are at the center of America, not government. And point of fact, just to develop on that, faith and family are the only real restraints on government at any level. And to the extent that you see government and politicians pursue policies that undermine religious freedom, that undermine family...the family structure, you are growing government such that we ARE a government-centric society and not a free society anymore. Family and faith are the restraints on government, it cannot be said enough, it's not internalized by enough, and I'm glad the President said it, even if sometimes he doesn't act in furtherance of it. For more on the State of the Union, we're pleased to be joined by our friend Tim Carney, senior political columnist for the Examiner. Tim, thanks for joining us, appreciate it. Carney: Hey, thank you for having me. And before you get to what you want to talk to me about, I want to double down on what you just said, with a slight amendment; faith, family, and community, and I think it's important to point that out, that for a lot of us when we say faith, we mean our church community, but faith is also an individual thing, but I have to say that without that local community, whether it's local government, a congregation, a swim club, whatever that is, that's necessary in order for faith and family to be strong. So local community I always look at as that is the real check on government, that when Democrats say "government is the things we do together", we have to say "No, actually, you know...the Swim Club, the PTA, this Parish Breakfast, those are the things we do together. Government is, at best, ONE of the things we do together, and at worst, are things that politicians do to us." Proft: I take that friendly amendment and completely agree, it's what de Tocqueville wrote about in "Democracy in America", it's what our friend we just had on last week, Patrick Dineen from Notre Dame...soon to not be the Fighting Irish but from Notre Dame, talked about it in his new book, "How Liberalism Failed" (sic, "Why Liberalism Failed"), and no, that's precisely right. Carney: And I was glad that Donald Trump did mention that, and the point we make in our Washington Examiner editorial is that there's a bit of a shift in from the normal Trump rhetoric. Now obviously this is a speech that is written by many speech writers, not just by Stephen Miller like many of his campaign speeches, and not just kind of ad-libbed, like the average Donald Trump speech. And the shift is that he did talk more about faith and family in this than him being a strong leader or him having success. And the other thing was that the words "strong" and "strength" showed up a lot, I think I counted 13 times that those words showed up. But normally when he would talk about this...there were those sort of disturbing moments in the campaign, or early on, where he praised Putin for being strong leader, or talked about Rodrigo Dutarte, the southeast Asian sort of...strongman, and praised those guys. And so we said, this is sort of a scary totalitarian strength. But last night, the strength was sort of a collective strength, or the strength of an average man. It was about the people, and individuals, and communities being strong, rather than about the central state being strong. And it reminded me, he was talking about Houston, and then asking Joe Kennedy...you know, the way we often use strong in our culture, "Boston Strong", "Houston Strong", communities pulling together, NOT the central state having lots of power. So I thought that was a very salutary shift in the State of the Union, and we thought it was notable enough that that's what was in our editorial box this morning. Jacobson: Yeah. And, he wants to work with both parties, there was a message of unity as well. In about 45 minutes into his address, there's a message about immigration, about letting 1.8 million people, you know, Dreamers, stay here in the country. But, there was some hissing by the Democrats when he, BRIEFLY, rolled out his plan. Carney: Yes he...there were a couple of moments in there where Trump was trying to, and I think was successful in, drive a wedge in between the Democrats and the majority of the country. This is typical politics, I think that Bill Clinton did it better than anybody else. Bush and Obama tried to do it, in that...you KNOW where the Democrats are, you know that they can't applaud something you're going to say, and you know that most of the people are on your side. And it's sort of the "end to chain migration" combined with the compassionate thing with the policy for those who were brought in here as children, either as children or overstayed their visas, that that's a compromise that most Americans like. But it increasingly looks like something that Democrats are not happy to take. So, at best Trump is sort of pressuring the Democrats into taking this deal they don't want, and at worst he's highlighting how far they are from the American public. Proft: Can we get bipartisan agreement, you think, on this truism that I identified yesterday? That Oregon senator Ron Wyden is the spitting image of Super Dave as Funkhouser on Curb Your Enthusiasm? I mean, is that not true? Carney: I think that the more interesting appearance last night was Congressman Joe Kennedy, the third generation of Kennedy's. Both his kind of striking Irish look, one of my colleagues went "Man, what a GINGER!", when Kennedy went out on the stage. Which I think maybe should be the next name for Notre Dame's football team, the Gingers. (Proft: Oh yeah, the Gingers! Jacobson: Yeah, the Gingers, sure!) But also the unfortunate lip balm that was distracting everybody from what Joe Kennedy was saying on TV. Jacobson: Well, do you think that he was effective at all? I mean, it sounds to me...it felt, it felt to me as if he was just reading a script, that he didn't really feel anything, whereas Trump's was more genuine. Carney: It's hard to read and not sound like you're reading. (Proft: It's all put-upon passion.) Actually, I was just thinking about Barack Obama. And a lot of people criticized Barack Obama for using...from all of his use of a teleprompter. But what was remarkable was that Obama could read from a teleprompter, and sound like he meant it. Have you guys tried this? I've done it before, and I've read from a teleprompter, and I sounded intelligible, but I didn't sound genuine. It's really hard to do! So Joe Kennedy having a hard time with that. Trump's sound...gets kind of weirdly muted, to the point that at the beginning of the speech as he talked, people wondered what kind of medication he took to just chill out and do it. And it has a positive effect...and I don't know why! Maybe just because we're all sort of bracing for weird Trump, and flying off the rails Trump, so when he's acting calm, we sort of relax. It's interesting watching Trump read. Proft: Well, last night, we got storyteller Trump, and I gotta tell you, he was a pretty good storyteller. I mean, he had good material to work with there, their incredible stories, unbelievable stories. But I was...I mean, I cannot recall a more powerful moment during a State of the Union address than that young man from North Korea holding up his crutches and kind of thrusting them up in the air as kind of a defiant symbol for freedom. I mean, is there a better moment that you can recall in a State of the Union? Carney: No, that was great. As a New Yorker, when the subway hero was invoked, that guy who jumped down and pinned a child down to the tracks so he wouldn't get run over by the train and was on top to protect him, that was a really touching moment because of the backstory. But the unreal visuals of the man there and...that he...the unreal circumstances...yeah, that he fled from. And then having the actual prop of the crutches was great. And again, back to sort of our original point, these are my favorite parts of the State of the Union address...and even Obama did this, for all of his big government-ism, he had to say, because this is something Americans believe in a politician, however collectivist or state-ist, has to say it, that it is these things that make America great, that we can be proud of the big things that involved the government; winning World War 2 and saving Europe, and landing on the Moon...but sort of the everyday things, saying that this is what we expect of Americans, the Cajun Navy *glitch* going to Houston after the Hurricane, these people who do these amazing things and have these amazing stories of freedom because they love America, or heroes like the policewoman who adopted the baby and saved the woman who's possibly going to overdose from heroin...that these are the stories of individual heroes that really...that Americans love. It's part of our DNA, that we're looking for the person to go out there and to be a hero, or the groups, again, like the Cajun Navy, the volunteers, to do it, rather than always turning to the government in a way that Bernie Sanders might. Proft: Yeah, I know, and I think your point about it being other regarding, and the contrast between ego-maniacs on the floor and the Americans in the gallery on the second level couldn't be more stark, and I think that's what had great appeal. He is Tim Carney, senior political columnist for the Washington Examiner, WashingtonExaminer.com, check out their review of Trump's State of the Union at WashingtonExaminer.com. Tim, thanks for joining us, appreciate it. Carney: Thank you!

Related Content

Why Liberalism Failed

Our rights are endowed by the Creator but what happens when society no longer believes in the Creator? If it’s no longer in style to settle down and have a family, what happens to a civilization that doesn’t have a true sense of duty or obligation to somebody else besides themselves? Does multiculturalism move society away from a common culture? Notre Dame Philosophy Professor and author of “Why Liberalism Failed," Patrick Deneen joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

Related Content

Choose Kindness

“Augie can’t change the way he looks but we can change the way we see.” Augie is a character in the new movie “Wonder”, based on the novel, about a young boy with facial deformities and his journey of self-acceptance and the relationships he makes along the way. The message of choosing kindness is prevalent throughout the film and inspires everyone to embrace each other’s differences; to see others for who they really are and not simply the way they look on the outside. Todd Lieberman, one of the producers of the film, joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

Related Content

What Happened To Social Conservatives In Politics?

Is culture everything? Are we losing sight of basic truths? Why has the left been effective in shutting down the conservative message? What are they doing that social conservatives are not? How has the Republican Party rendered themselves useless in the culture war? Senior fellow at the American Principles Project, Maggie Gallagher joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

View full transcript


Dan Proft: Pleased to be joined by Maggie Gallagher, who is a Senior Fellow for the American Principles Project. And she's written an excellent piece in "First Things" that we referenced earlier in the week, about politics and culture, essentially arguing that those who suggest politics is downstream from culture don't have it quite right. So let's explore that with Maggie Gallagher, who joins us now. Thank you so much for being with us, appreciate it. Maggie Gallagher: Well, it's great to be with you, thank you, good morning. Proft: My perspective on this is that culture is everything, and so I concede your point that politics is a part of culture, which is what you write in your piece. But does the nature of politics being a part of culture mean that we aren't ultimately...or shouldn't ultimately be focused on...kind of...the proverbial "culture war"? Gallagher: No. It means right now, we're living in an America where everything is being de-normed, so that people who kind of believe in some simple basic truths like "we're born male and female", "we have a need for men and women to come together so they can raise the next generation together, that idea is called marriage", these things are now being de-normed as hateful. And it's obvious that the Republican Party is increasingly useless in terms of doing anything about this. And so the question is...what do we conclude from that? I would agree absolutely with the people who say culture is really important, and those of us who are people of faith have to figure out how to build creative subculture communities that transmit our own values and our own face to the next generation. The only thing I don't agree about is that we should somehow get out of politics. We took a really serious look...what I really believe is the reason that social conservatives are easily betrayed and not very politically influential...the most important reason, there's a lot of reasons...the most important reason is we're not really in politics. We just...we TALK like we're in politics. And people would go on television and say political things, but if you follow the money, what you find out is that we, unlike the Left and particularly the gay Left, have not built political institutions. So we looked at every organization in America that says it has some public policy goals around marriage or religious liberty. And we asked "Okay, how much of your money do you spend in politics, affecting who wins an election?" That's what politics is. It's not pastor organizing, or 501c3 voter guides...fundamentally, these are all fine things to do, but fundamentally they circle around...are you actually going to go into politics and elect your heroes, and un-elect your enemies? And the answer is, 97 cents of every dollar we spend to affect public policy is a non-profit, 501c3 apolitical strategy. And the Left doesn't do this, by the way, they don't do it at all! You just take the top three socially liberal organizations, Emily's List, Planned Parenthood, and Human Rights Campaign. And in the last election cycle, they spent $70 million just in *inaudible* money, and social conservatives spent less than $10 million. So you know, every single organization in this country...so I would say we should give politics a chance, before we conclude that it's useless. Right now, it's a problem for everyone, the grassroots and the donors have nowhere to go, because the organizations that claim to be political or are standing there and trying to be political aren't actually in politics. So you know, that's just a fundamental hole that has to be filled if we're not going to be persecuted in America as the ideology that our ideas are like racism and hatred unfolds. Proft: Just to give a concrete example of this, you do in your piece, but I want you to connect the dots for us, about...if you want to fight for this culture, if you want to fight for your value system, then you necessarily have to be involved politics, because the other side is aggressively pursuing it, and they're happy to roll right over you as we see being done. But the example you give about how the Left does it versus how conservatives don't do it effectively is a former Colorado Congresswoman, Marilyn Musgrave. Give the Marilyn Musgrave case study to us. Gallagher: Well that's just so...at one point in my life I was probably the major spokesman fighting gay marriage. So I watched a lot of this unfold. So one of the things I've watched unfold and I learned from...everything I know about politics, I say, I learned from watching how the gay Left actually countered me. So, Marilyn Musgrave was a Colorado Congressman, she was one of the original sponsors of the Federal Marriage Amendment, which would have said marriage was one man and one woman, didn't say anything else, and would have prevented the Supreme Court from doing what it did to overturn our efforts in state. But, the Left targeted her for her opposition to gay marriage, but they didn't fight her on that in her district. They knew she was representing her voters. So instead they just raised a bunch of money, and they dumped it in negative ads on her, on all kinds of issues, including as she told me personally, she said "They even ran...they created fake pro-life organizations, to demonstrate, or to claim at least, that I wasn't pro-life enough." And they did it in one election cycle, and they knocked down her numbers so she barely hung on, and then they came back in the next election cycle and they defeated her. And everyone in Congress...although the voters even in her district probably don't know...they said the reason she lost is that she was a spokesman against gay marriage. And it's an extremely effective way of shutting down one party's issue. So the Democrats are all in, and they're pro-gay marriage, and equality and love wins all, and the Republican Party is kind of silent and shy. They can't quite be for gay marriage because they know their voters won't tolerate it, but they won't speak because they don't want to become targets for the Left. Jacobson: Well, how has the LGBT community tightened its hold on culture shaping? Gallagher: Well, they...one of the reasons why politics is more important for conservatives than it is for liberals is that liberals dominate most of the other means of culture creation. So one of the things I can tell you because I was there is that the problem wasn't really that our messages don't work, it's that they effectively shut down our ability to get our message out. So the more effective I was, or we were, we were working together in state, so once we won California and Prop 8 in the year 2008, suddenly I was unable to get on Fox News. Suddenly I was unable to get on conservative radio...you know, the major stations, the big boys with the big advertisers. And it took about another year before suddenly I wasn't able to get on CNN, and eventually I could only go on MSNBC, where they would openly treat me with contempt if I showed up. So, you know I'd like to give you the other examples of other people, but the capacity to control what you see through Hollywood or Madison Avenue...and the big new thing is corporations are now joining social liberal. So corporations that...the Chamber of Commerce is the most effective and most public component of conscience protection for traditional beliefs in the state. And people are afraid if they say things, that they'll lose their jobs. And that'll be the lesson. And of course I could talk about what's going on at colleges and the academies, if you look at it. So politics, so what I learned when I was very young and Ronald Reagan was elected president is that politics is the way that you can break through that messaging shut down, and learn that you're not alone, that other people have the same views and values as you do. And I think that is one reason why it's important to recognize this Ron Dreher, this Benedict Option, that we are facing new threats to Christianity, and to do a lot of things; build faithful communities who exemplify Christ, but one of the things we can't afford to do is retreat from politics. You have to learn how to do it better, how to do it real, how to do it as a subculture and a minority that really does need new protection, because the fact that President Trump is not aggressively pursuing the same strategies to use government to oppress us doesn't mean the next President won't do it if there's not legislative protection. And without a real political movement, the GOP is going to be useless, it's not going to act. Proft: She is Maggie Gallagher, she's a senior fellow at the American Principles Project. A piece that you should check out, that I tweeted, @DanProft, is "Culture is Downstream from politics", which you can also find at FirstThings.com. Maggie, thanks so much for joining us, appreciate your time. Gallagher: Thank you, buh bye.

Related Content

What Does It Take To Forgive Your Fellow Man?

Forgiveness is not an act of weakness but what is its purpose? What is the definition of forgiveness? What is a human being worth? Is preventing murder a priority in our society? Former Chicago newsman now filmmaker, Garrad McClendon joins Dan and Amy to discuss his new film documenting the horrific murder of his parents, “Forgiving Cain.”

Related Content

Students Don’t Reject Abstinence. They’ve Never Heard It.

Graduating from high school, not committing a crime, and having kids after marriage almost guarantees that a person will never live a life in poverty. Counter to the hyper-sexualized media narrative, 70% of high school students are not sexually active. Shouldn’t students at least have the opportunity to see the benefits of marriage and family? If kids aren’t rejecting the message, where does the miscommunication lie? Executive Director at Abstinence and Marriage Education Partnership, Scott Phelps joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

Related Content