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radical islamic terrorism

Rep. Omar’s Anti-Semitism

Is the BDS (boycott, divestment, and sanctions against Israel) movement supported by Rep. Omar and terrorist organization, Hamas, reflective of equality and American values? Do Democrats still think Trump worked with the Russian government despite the findings from the Mueller Report? Senior editor from Hotair.com, Ed Morrissey joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Is Comey In Trouble?

What was the point of releasing the Mueller report since the Democrats continue to discuss fact free conspiracy theories? Did Comey already omit he didn’t know if there was enough evidence to surveil the Trump campaign? Is Comey’s political nature and hatred against the Commander in Chief unprecedented behavior for a former FBI Director? Former Deputy Director of the National Counterterrorism Center and FBI special agent, Kevin Brock joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Easter Worshippers

“Christianity under attack? Sri Lanka church bombings stroke far-right anger in the West”

That was the headline in the Washington Post the day after the world learned the Easter Sunday church bombers were radical Islamist terrorists.

It seems the Post isn’t sure if Christianity is under attack. But it is sure only the “far-right” is upset about the massacre of “Easter worshippers,” as they term them.

Historically, The Left has used perceived persecution to accrue power. So they’re reticent to have Christians benefit from actual persecution, thus they use the label, “Easter worshippers” as if it’s a Spring festival of sorts.

This is how identity politics works and it is at work in the coverage of the slaughter of Christian innocents.

Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and leading Democrats all used “Easter worshippers” language  generating much deserved pushback.

No atrocity is so great as to prevent the Left’s pursuit of power.

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Democrats’ Low Bar Of Moderation

Are we no longer vigilant on the war on terror? Is the Democrat primary for a president an opportunity for candidates to play Santa Claus and promise free stuff? Is the voice of moderation in the Democrat party a voice that supports reparations? Senior editor for National Review, Jay Nordlinger joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Successes Of Trump's "Principled Realism" In Foreign Affairs

What should POTUS highlight at his first State Of The Union after the first year of his presidency on the foreign policy front? How much credit does Trump deserve from removing ISIS’ control and territory? Is he going to address the Taliban and their recent string of attacks? What are the odds of the survival of the Iran deal? Former US Ambassador to the UN, John Bolton joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

View full transcript


Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. How has Trump principled, realistic foreign policy served American interests in Year One of his presidency? That's something that I'm sure he will tackle, at least in part, during his State of the Union address tonight. That was part of the conversation during the World Economic Forum in Davos last week, and there was a very interesting exchange between Israel Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu and Fareed Zakaria on the controversial...I GUESS...decision for Trump to move the US Embassy to Jerusalem, recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital...something that previous presidents had SAID...Trump was the only one that MOVED on it. And Bibi Netanyahu had this reaction to the President's decision, much to the chagrin one of one globalist named Fareed Zakari. Netanyahu (from tape): The seat of government is in Jerusalem. This has been the case for the 70 years of Israel's existence, that we're celebrating now. Jerusalem has been the capital of the Jewish people since the time of King David, that's only three thousand years ago. So President Trump made history by recognizing history, recognizing these indelible facts of the past and the present. And under ANY peace agreement, you KNOW that the capital of Israel will continue to be Jerusalem, and the seat of our government will continue to be in Jerusalem, so I think on the contrary, he did a great service for peace, because peace can only be based on truth, on reality. And denying the simple fact that Israel's capital is Jerusalem pushes peace backwards by creating an illusion, fantasy. Can't build peace on fantasy. Proft: For more on this topic, and this aspect of the President's remarks tonight, we're pleased to be joined by our friend John Bolton, former US Ambassador to the United Nations, Ambassador Bolton thanks so much for joining us again, appreciate it. Bolton: Well, good morning! Glad to be with you. Proft: So how would you summarize Trump's first year on the foreign policy front, and whether or not decisions like the decision in Jerusalem have advanced the cause of peace of the world over? Bolton: Well, I think he's had an awful lot of successes, but he faces an awful lot of problems, because a number of due bills left to him by the previous administration are coming due: the North Korea nuclear program, the Iran nuclear program, chaos in the Middle East and a whole range of other issues. But I think it's...there's been a lot of hysteria about what Trump's foreign policy is. I think it ends up being in the mainstream of conservative Republican thinking on most issues. That's depressing and boring for a lot of the critics, maybe for some of the supporters too, but I think that's the reality. I think it's what we desperately needed after eight years of Barack Obama. Jacobson: Well, the Palestinians are none too happy if the embassy is moved to Jerusalem, but President Trump the other day said he'd deny them foreign aid if they don't continue with peace talks. Bolton: Look, I think it's time...it's time to shake up the conditions in the Middle East. We've been pursuing the two-state solutions, so called, between Israel and the Palestinians, for about six or seven decades, it's not working out too well. And I think what Netanyahu said about peace ultimately being based on truth rather than illusion, it's just something you can't argue with. So acknowledging Jerusalem as Israel's capital and saying we're going to put our embassy there, does just recognize reality. And by the way, to the people who say it prejudices the outcome of the negotiations, that's just not true. Trump's own statement says he's not intending to do that. The embassy, whether it is built from scratch or, as it looks like now, converted from an existing consulate facility, will be in territory always recognized as WEST Jerusalem, WEST of the Green Line, NEVER under claim by the Palestinians. So this is just one example of an urban legend that's been out there for decades, it was never going anywhere. And the idea, for example, that the only people in the world for whom refugee status is inheritable, like DNA, are the Palestinians. That impedes the peace process as well. So the President withheld half of the operating budget of the UN Agency that works with the Palestinians, and as you say, he basically threatened to take off the table the direct aid that the United States gives the Palestinians, for which, by the way, we have ample statutory grounds, and some would say requirements, that the State Department hasn't yet met. So it's a painful reality that intrudes for some people, but I think it's the right thing to do. Proft: Ostensibly tonight the President will, in listing his successes, talk about crippling ISIS. Yesterday the Islamic State issued a new video, calling on "brothers in Europe, America, Russia, Australia, and elsewhere" to "kill them all, now it's time to rise". What is the state of the Islamic State, and how much credit does Trump deserve for removing them...removing their control from places like Syria and Iraq? Bolton: Well, I think that the Territorial Caliphate has largely been destroyed. I think there are still some pockets of resistance, our military says it's a few weeks until they're taken care of, I suspect that's right. And I think it was important to destroy the Territorial Caliphate, because it's holding territory that gives ISIS the color of legitimacy to its claim that it is indeed a legitimate Islamic Caliphate. But losing that territory doesn't mean that ISIS disappears. We know for a fact that a lot of its people got out of the Caliphate, and escaped to places like Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Afghanistan, and Pakistan to continue the terrorist attacks against the West, and I do think that they will continue. So, there's been an important victory. I do think that Trump's changing of the rules of engagement for American forces was helpful in that regard. But I think it was not helpful that we continued basically many of the policies of the Obama years, supporting the government of Iraq which is, sad today these days, a subsidiary of the government of Iran, the Ayotollahs basically control it. And that's one reason that we still face enormous threats in the Middle East; to Israel, to our Arab friends, as well as our own interests there as well. Jacobson: Do you think President Trump will address the Taliban? I mean, they killed 100 people, they filled an ambulance with explosives, and then earlier in the week 22 Americans were killed at the Intercontinental Hotel, a good friend of the show, Greg Selig, was there, hiding in-between mattresses, and he had this 13 hours of Hell, and they tracked him down and they killed him. I mean, there seems to be something there with the Taliban. Bolton: Well, I think the President was pretty forceful at lunch yesterday with the UN Security Council when he said "We're not gonna talk to those people." And ultimately, this argument that this group of fanatics and terrorists would sit down and have a nice corporate conference around a conference table was always delusional. I think you've got to defeat these people. It may take a long time, but if you want the terrorist threat eliminated, if you want to make sure they don't re-take Afghanistan, and provide a new base for ISIS or al-Qaeda to threaten Pakistan, with terrorists taking over there and getting their hands on Pakistan's arsenal of nuclear weapons, which is estimated publicly to be 60 or more, maybe up to 200. This is just something that...it's unpleasant, Americans don't like to deal with these long-term lingering infections, but that's what it is, and to preserve the safety of innocent civilians here in the United States, far better to deal with them over there than deal with them over here. Proft: Dr. Richard Benkin has a piece in American Thinker where he profiles a Pashtun village elder who is very complimentary of President Trump's policy. He talks about President Trump's...and Pashtun's generally speaking, a favored form of democratic rule...small D. He has...but this elder that he profiles suggests that Trump is right for calling out Pakistan for decades of lies and deceit, duplicity in the War on Terror. He says that successive US Governments have given Pakistan billions of dollars, and its people...for its people's welfare and to fight the War on Terror, and in return Pakistan has given us nothing BUT terrorism. This kind of in the North Waziristan area that kind of borders Afghanistan and Pakistan. And I wonder if that is a perspective, although anecdotal, that informs US policy, and Trump's policy, towards Pakistan...or at least it SHOULD, and thus the basis for us to retain some presence there. Bolton: Well, I think Trump's decision recently to withhold assistance from Pakistan was correct, I think from time to time you've gotta show 'em the cold steel, and that was a necessary decision. But, I think it's also important to remember, and I said this a moment ago, that they've got a substantial supply of nuclear weapons, and if the terrorists took control, we would find ourselves with Iran on steroids. So it's a difficult balance to walk, it's a country that every time you turn around you've got to grit your teeth and think about it. I had a friend, a colleague, at the State Department, who said that the government of Pakistan is the only government he knows that consists simultaneously of arsonists and firefighters. And, and, and...and, and that's about right, and that's why it's hard to deal with. But, if you walk away from them, China will basically insert itself as the dominant external power, you'll have this greater risk of even more proliferation of nuclear weapons and this risk of conflict with India rises as well. So, it's hard, and it does require a well thought-out strategy, which is something again, Trump inherited basically a vacuum in terms of strategic policy regarding Pakistan, and he's still gotta make one up. Proft: You talked about the prospect of Pakistan becoming Iran on steroids, if terrorists got a hold of the nuclear weapons...what about Iran, minus the steroids, the actual Iran, and Trump and his position on the Iran Nuclear Deal, and his position that it was the worst deal in American history, at least at a foreign policy level. What are you hoping he says about the survivability of that deal tonight? Bolton: Well, I think if he just repeats what he said before, it'll be a reminder to everybody in Congress that he's still waiting to see if they can come up with anything. I mean, I would have abrogated this deal on January the 20th, 2017, during the Inaugural Address, because it was a strategic mistake. It was the worst diplomatic deceit that the United States has ever suffered, and it hasn't gotten any better with age. So I'm...I'm...if you put me down as what my druthers would be, we would have been out of it long ago. But if it's not gonna come till May, so be it. This is a good time to work with our allies in Europe, and others around the world, to talk about the reality that is going to exist on that date in May when Trump pulls the plug on this thing, which I certainly hope he does. Proft: He is Ambassador John Bolton, former US ambassador to the United Nations, Ambassador Bolton thanks again for joining us, appreciate it. Bolton: Always glad to be with you, thanks for having me!

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Iranian Protesters Chant For “Bread, Jobs, And Liberty”

Who's on the invite list for Nikki Haley's party? Is the UN having trouble hiding their blatant anti-Israel/anti-semitic beliefs? Is all foreign aid from the US moving forward going to have strings attached, especially to those nations who have proven to be the worst defenders of religious freedom? Is the leftist media missing out on covering the powerful protests in Iran to showcase Muslims who are advocating for freedom against an oppressive theocratic regime? President of the Islamic Forum for Democracy, Dr. Zuhdi Jasser joins Dan and Amy to discuss. 

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Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. So, so...how big...is it...Mr. President? How big is it, Mr. President? ...you're supposed to do that in your Marilyn Monroe... Jacobson: Oh, that's right. *Monroe impression* How big is it, Mr. President? Proft: You know, the button. Jacobson: Yeah, the button. He tweeted last night that Kim-Jong-un (sic) said "the button is on his desk at all times. Will someone from his depleted and food-starved regime please inform him that I too have a nuclear button, but it is much bigger, a more powerful button than his, and my button works!' Exclamation point. Proft: ...yeah. Jacobson: Wow. Proft: Torrent of... Jacobson: Yes, a torrent... Proft: Torrent of tweets yesterday from the President... Jacobson: He's gonna be handing out the most dishonest and corrupt media awards of the year on Monday at 5 o'clock! Proft: Oh, I'll set my watch accordingly. Subjects will cover dishonesty and bad reporting in multiple categories. Oh boy, it's a run up to the Oscars. Jacobson: Mmhmm. He's gonna hand out a Fake News Trophy. Proft: So yeah, the North Korea tweet is sort of silly and juvenile. I don't get it. More interesting to me is the party that Nikki Haley's throwing, and if you condemn the United States, you're not invited. You don't get to come to Nikki Haley's party. Nikki Haley, to thank the 65 countries that did NOT support a resolution condemning President Trump's position on Jerusalem, recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, having a little party. But the 9 countries that voted...well the 9 countries that voted against the resolution, 35 abstained, and 128 nations voted in favor of it, so most of the world not invited. For more on these geopolitical matters, we're pleased to be joined by our friend, Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, President of the Islamic Forum for Democracy, co-founder of the Muslim Reform Movement, former US Navy Lieutenant...Lieutenant Commander, excuse me...and author of the book "A Battle for the Soul of Islam", Dr. Jasser, thanks for joining us again, appreciate it. Jasser: Oh it's great to be with you again, Happy New Year! Proft: Happy New Year! What about the recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital, and the reaction that has ensued, at the UN and also majority Muslim countries around the world? Jasser: Well, I think it serves to show quite a bit that basically the recognition of what's been a fact in Israel, that Jerusalem is their capital, their connect (?) is there, their Supreme Court, ministries are all there. But yet we continue for decades to have had campaign rhetoric never bear out during the administration, be it Bush, Clinton, Obama, any administration. And now finally, President Trump has made the words of his campaign a reality and we recognize the capitol. And I think what's happening is we've taken off the table something that should have never BEEN on the table, which is the recognition of a capitol, the fact that Israel can declare its own capitol. And the bottom line is it should have never been on the peace table because it is not up for negotiation. We will never give in on letting Israel declare its own capital. And there's a lot of confusion happening in the Middle East...intentionally, that this isn't about East Jerusalem, it's about West Jerusalem. And yet, Turkey and other Islamist regimes are trying to exploit this, to say this is anti-Islam, etc. In the end I think this will help the peace process, eventually, because it will take off the table something that should have never been on, and let them get to the brass tacks of what are the real...what the other real issues are in this crisis? Jacobson: Well, if this is such a good idea, where are such a number of our allies against it? France, Germany...I mean the list goes on and on? Jasser: Because they have for long been having this kind of inferiority complex to the Islamic governments, where they have a veto in the UN. Why for so long has the UN had so much of its time exploited on issues related to Israel, when there are real human rights issues in Iran, and Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia, and elsewhere? That's because the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, based out of Saudi Arabia, loves to demonize the other, and there's no simpler way to do it than to demonize the Jewish State, and it's all based on anti-Semitism with the...the State Department itself has called it the new anti-Semitism, which is a couching of anti-Israel rhetoric into what is really anti-Semitism. Proft: Yeah, and frankly you're hearing from Jewish leaders in places like Germany and western Europe about the rise of anti-Semitism there, to your point, Dr. Jasser. What about, on a related topic, the saber rattling of the President on funding for Palestinians, on funding foreign aid for Pakistan? Jasser: Well, it's amazing to me that we've never had this conversation before! Which is we hand a billion dollars to Egypt, we hand a billion dollars to Pakistan, and Hamas and other areas in which these enemies of America end up using our money to spread ideologies that threaten us, and yet we never make them pay a price. I sit on the US Commission for Religious Freedom, and every year we list the countries that are the worst offenders of religious freedom, and there's statutes in Congress, put in place to impose sanctions, yet every the White House...Obama, and Bush before him, put in waivers to allow Saudi Arabia and other nations to bypass those sanctions, because of stability and other security issues, when in fact the classic instability was regimes that had ideologies that run anathema to our own security! So I think it's about time for us to say "You know what? The blank check is not going to be written anymore, and if you're going to get aid from the United States, it's going to come with strings attached, which are sharing our values, and at least endorsing human rights in your own country." Jacobson: We normally...I mean, history proves we pay for...I mean, we pay our enemies so we can maintain peace. Don't you agree? Jasser: Well, I think that's a facade. To say that they maintain peace, that's sort of the albatross that they put over our heads and say "Well if you don't do this, we're going to do X Y and Z," when in fact they need us a lot more than we need them. And the only downside to this may be oil crises...bottom line is even at the height of our relationship with Pakistan, they were still harboring bin Laden and others, so this is often a deception, that will, I think, if you push them forward on it, may have a few little skirmishes here or there, but at the end of the day...they need us a lot more than we need them. Proft: Obama's friends in Iran...you know, the Ayatollahs? Are they in danger of being felled, in your opinion, by a popular revolt? Jasser: I pray so. I think there'd be nothing better as you and I have talked before, than some disruption in the Middle East, and especially you will see the connections that Iran has with Hezbollah, Syria Assad, and Yemen, and across the region as they become more inwardly focused, and for hopefully this Arab Spring now becoming a Persian Spring. We have a President now that is, at least rhetorically, defending them, which can actually go a long way. You'd be surprised how long seeing America and our leadership from the UN, with Nikki Haley and President Trump saying "we have their backs"...this is a very different revolt than in '09. '09 was simply in Tehran. This one is in 20 different cities, and it's focused in the cities were the theocrats and the Supreme Council are based, which is in Qom and other major cities. So, as long as this doesn't fizzle out with some of the human rights abuses that are happening in the past couple of days, with police tanks beginning to mow over people, if this can continue I think it may be the beginning of the end for the Islamic Republic. Jacobson: Well for those who don't know, what's life like in Iran? They're talking about how people are hungry for food and for freedom, but inflation is through the roof. Can you just describe what life is like? Jasser: That's a great question. Because people say "Oh, this is just simply about, you know, technical issues." No! The chanting for the most part has been about bread, jobs, and liberty. They have no ability to express themselves. Two days into this revolt, the internet has been turned off, women are hit on their ankles if their dresses...if their skirts are above their ankles, they aren't allowed to go out on the street if they aren't wearing a hijab, gays are thrown from the roof, you can't be publicly homosexual, or have any type of speech which is critical of Islam, or of the government, so from free speech to the ability to make money...they saw billions coming into the government over the last two years after Obama handed back $150 billion and they're saying in their chants that they see NONE of that. And that's why they're no longer saying "Death to America" or "Death to Israel", they're saying "Death to the regime, death to the dictator, and death to Hezbollah!" Which I think, if you want to...I am SO disappointed at the left media, the New York Times and the CNN and ABC, they're covering it just a little bit...but what better image do you want for Americans to abandon this concept that all Muslims are Islamists than to see tens of thousands of Muslims chanting these slogans, which will forever put away these stereotypes that we're all Islamists or theocrats? Proft: Yeah, that's an excellent point. Domestically, in the first quarter of this year, immigration policy is going to be central to the political discussion in DC, with respect to the DACA Program, and what the President will want in exchange, both in respect to border security on the country's southern border as well as this issue of sanctuary city and sanctuary state designations, localities and even some states, like Illinois, like California, refusing to work with Federal Immigration Enforcement. What do you think a sensible compromise on these issues...where the President has indicated he's WILLING to compromise on DACA...what do you think that looks like? Jasser: Well I really think the sensible policy is really what the President has been articulating over the past few weeks; we build the wall, we stop the sieve, and then we also begin to compromise on what we do with the 11 million or more folks that are here illegally, and perhaps allow DACA to exist. So, you know, you have to have a compromise there, and also in immigration we need to begin to have an ideological vetting and that...it's not a right to come to the US, these diversity programs or lotteries...it should not be random as to who comes to the United States. It should be those who are seeking American freedom, American principles, that share our social contract. It was bizarre to see Tim Kaine tweet today "Well, if we opened and allowed immigration from Iran, that would somehow...that would support the Iranian people." Huh? That doesn't make any sense! You support those who share our values, but they're trying to fix their OWN country, it's not about coming to the United States. And those who do need to escape, from places like Syria and elsewhere, where they've had no other option, then we need to vet against jihadists and Islamic etc. There needs to be a whole-of-government approach to where we don't just say "Well yes, maybe they need some human rights solution," but that human rights solution has to be married to a sharing of our values. We can't bring in Communists and other types of idealogues that don't share our values. And the immigration reform has to include that. I mean still today, the immigration paperwork asks you "Are you or have you ever been a supporter of the Communist Party?" That made sense during the Cold War, and we need to impose similar types of restrictions in this global war against jihad. Proft: Alright, he is Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, President of the Islamic Forum for Democracy, co-founder of the Muslim Reform Movement, former US Navy Lieutenant Commander, and the author of the book "A Battle for the Soul of Islam", Dr. Jasser, thanks for joining us again, appreciate it. Jasser: Thank you, appreciate being on.

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Has Trump Given Up U.S.' Global Leadership?

What are the fatal consequences from the recent investigative report published in Politico surrounding Obama and his decisions related to Hezbollah that is being skirted by the DC press corps? Will Iran's youth topple Obama's buddy Rouhani and the mullahs? Should we be doing a lot more to help the Iranian protesters? Is North Korea planning a disruption during the Olympics in South Korea? Former United States Deputy Undersecretary of Defense and contributor to the Washington Times and The American Spectator, Jed Babbin joins Dan and Amy to discuss the biggest threats against the US in 2018.

View full transcript


Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. Happy 2018! Jim Comey rang in the new year with this tweet; "Here's hoping 2018 brings more ethical leadership focus on the truth and lasting values." Yeah, I agree, Jim. Let's start with the FBI, shall we? Fareed Zakaria, the kind of insufferable globalist on CNN, he wrote the book "Rise of the Rest", which I read, and has...all of his predictions have... Jacobson: ...not come true? Proft: *laughing* ...have been wholly inaccurate to this point, but he's HOPING they come true. And he's trying to shoehorn his predictions into Trump's first year, suggesting that Trump has retreated...has led the US retreat from the global stage. Here's Fareed Zakaria's commentary. Zakaria (from tape): It's creator, upholder, and enforcer, the United States has withdrawn into self-centered isolation. The second great supporter and advocate of the open, rule-based world, Europe, has not been able to act assertively on the world stage with any clear vision or purpose. And in this period, China, Russia, and a host of smaller, illiberal powers are surging forward to fill the vacuum. Some years ago, I described a post-American world, brought on not by the decline of America, I said, but the rise of the rest. That process has been well underway, but has now been dramatically accelerated by the Trump administration's foolish and self-defeating decision to resign as the world's leader. As the President might say in one of his tweets, "Sad!" Proft: Yeah, is that right? It doesn't seem to me that it's particularly right...withdrawn...into isolation. Let's see...ISIS has been virtually eliminated in terms of its presence in Syria and Iraq, BS controlled territory there, and that was in part due to action taken by this President. He's increased troop levels in Afghanistan, and that doesn't strike me as particularly isolationist. He's done a number of, kind of, "get to know you" regional tours of the world. He's enforced some, kind of, budget discipline at the UN of all places! So I'm not exactly sure what Fareed Zakaria is talking about. Perhaps our friend Jed Babbin can give us more insight. Jed Babbin, former United States Deputy Undersecretary of Defense, contributor to the Washington Times, and American Spectator. Jed, thanks for joining us, appreciate it. Babbin: Well guys, great to be with you. It's my first radio hit for the year! Proft: Alright! Well... Jacobson: Let's make it a good one! Proft: We're honored to have you...yeah, let's go! Jacobson: Don't mess this up! Babbin: *indistinguishable* Proft: Well, what about Zakaria's description of Trump's first year, and where America stands on...with respect to "the community of nations"? Babbin: Well, you know guys, knuckleheads like Zakaria equate withdrawing from the Paris climate change agreement as isolationism. So by his definition, sure, we're isolationists, but proud of it! The point comes down to, really, we are taking a leadership role much more than we have anytime in the past 8 years, the previous 8 years. And Mr. Trump is making some big strides! There are some huge challenges facing him right now, including what's going on in Iran, and North Korea. But I think that Mr. Trump is doing a much MUCH better job than what he's getting credit for. Jacobson: Well, President Trump tweeted support for the Iranian protesters out there. Do you think...I mean, there's a difference between protesting and rioting, and a lot of what I saw there over the weekend, the protesters lit one police station on fire, and there's been some vehicles turned over. Do you think he should have stayed out of it, or do you think he should have Tweeted about it? Babbin: Well I mean, he should have done a lot more than TWEET. These protesters are striking a blow for freedom! It's not just rioting in the sense that people are rioting senselessly, with no good reason. These people are protesting the oppression of this regime. They're attacking the besieged militiamen, who patrol their streets trying to put the riots and protests. And they're doing, I think, the right thing! We should be doing a lot more to help them, rather than just Tweeting about it! Proft: Well, the State Department...I mean, I agree with you, obviously...maybe it's that "We don't want to upset Obama's good friend Rohani and the Mullahs in Iran, right? They're our new partners in peace, aren't they?" Babbin: *sarcastically* Oh yeah...well yeah, sure. Proft: But the State Department did issue a statement, that was more than just Tweeting support; condemning the arrest of peaceful protesters, urging nations to support the Iranian people. I mean, these are young people, as you were characterizing, Jed. 60% of Iran is under the age of 30, it's an incredibly young nation. And one that frankly...and we've seen this before back in 2009 when Obama completely turned his back on the protesters, those yearning for freedom in Iran. They seem less and less willing to tolerate Islamofacism in their country. Babbin: Well, I think they're less and less willing to tolerate economic corruption. They don't want to see all of their money being spent abroad in places like Syria. And they're really just tired of not having the freedom that they all want. So you know, what we have to understand is that Iran is not monolithic. On one hand, you have the Ayatollahs, the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, the besieged militia...and all of those Shiite forces that are trying to keep the lid on these protests. On the other hand, you know...most of Iran is literate, they're fairly highly educated, there's widespread unemployment there, I think you said that 60% are under the age of 30, but most of those people are unemployed! And they're tired of it, so what they're trying to do is fix what is wrong in their country. And again, I think we have to take their side in a fairly bold way, and some of it needs to be covert. Jacobson: Let's move over to North Korea. Kim Jong-un in his New Year's Day address had a new look, he had a new suit, none of that mumu stuff, new glasses, new hairstyle, and he also extended an olive branch to South Korea, on the...with the Olympics being the main premise of the conversation. But could that lead to diplomatic talks? Babbin: Well it might, but I don't think it's going to. The South Koreans are not dumb. They see what he's trying to do, and he's trying to create some barrier or obstacle between us and the South Koreans. They're not gonna fall for it. They may try to go talk to them...fine. Why not? But the basic bottom line is Kim is not going to change his behavior, and if you read my Predictions column in Spectator yesterday, you'll know that I'm predicting that they'll try with missile launches and possibly with a nuclear detonation to disrupt the Olympics. I think that's a dang certainty. Proft: Give us your kind of rank assessment, or order of priority, then, Iran vs North Korea. Babbin: I think Iran...and I think Pakistan play into it too...you have three nations that are basically in a very bad position to push us towards the brink, push us towards war. Iran is cooperating with North Korea, so maybe the two of them combined are the highest threat we have. We know they're cooperating on missile development and the development of nuclear weapons. They both will...well, the North Koreans have both already...and the Iranians if they don't already have them, will also have them very quickly. So, these two and their cooperation is pretty much at the top of my list. And I think beyond that, you have to look at what's going on with Russia, in the Ukraine and elsewhere, with Syria and so forth. You have to look at what China is doing. China is building military bases in Pakistan, through this "China-Pakistan Economic Corridor" initiative. There's a lot going on this year, and quite frankly, none of it's going to be good. Proft: Well, and how should...this was a Politico story, so I'm not saying it wasn't covered by the DC Press Corps, it was by definition. But it certainly wasn't amplified on cable news, like so many other stories, particularly specious ones about Russian collusion. But how the Obama administration's derailed a DEA investigation into Hezbollah, Hezbollah turning...trafficking cocaine and laundering money, to finance its expansion. Hezbollah, a designated terrorist organization, just as Iran is a designated state sponsor of terror...but because Obama was playing footsie with those Islamofascists in Tehran, we allowed not only a glide-path for nuclearization of Iran but also for the expansion of this terrorist organization Hezbollah. Babbin: Well yeah, this was a very big story. It was popped out, quite frankly very surprisingly, by the very VERY liberal Hill Newspaper...or, I'm sorry, by Politico, even MORE liberal than the Hill! So this was a very deep investigative report that they put out about two months ago, and it showed that this "Operation Cassandra", the DEA operation to shut down Hezbollah's trafficking of money and drugs in the United States and around it, it was shut down because President Obama was pursuing his nuclear weapons deal with Iran. That is BEYOND shameful! Look, Obama failed, as we talked about earlier, to support the protests in the nascent revolution in 2009, The Green Movement. He went ahead and killed Operation Cassandra to benefit Hezbollah, to protect them, and get less adverse publicity for his nuclear deal, and he went ahead with the nuclear deal! That was, as Mr. Trump said, the worst deal possible. So Mr. Obama's motivations, I cannot understand. They certainly were totally inconsistent with America's national security interests, and at this point, we have to see where this all plays out. I'm hopeful that President Obama...President Trump, rather...will go ahead and cancel the nuclear weapons deal this month, when he's due to certify it again, but I kind of doubt that he will because his advisers, all of our allies, are pushing him to not do that. Jacobson: Well, in your article that you wrote in the American Spectator, you wrote about Hezbollah, and you predict they're gonna fire 500 missiles into Israel? Babbin: Well, maybe more than that. I mean, they've got about 10,000, or...I've heard all sorts of numbers, 10,000, 100,000. Last time Israel and Hezbollah fought was 2006, they're about ready to do so again. Iran is building military bases in Syria, very close to the Golan Heights on the Israeli border. There's things there that are about to blow up, and I think they will this year, unfortunately. It will take many many lives, but I think there's going to be a missile strike on Israel by Hezbollah, those missiles will be shot down by...well, they've got three big systems, what they call the Iron Dome system, anti-missile system. Below that is David's Sling, another anti-missile system. And below that the Arrow System, which is kind of what we call our Patriot missile...anti-missile system. Most of those things fired by Hezbollah will not reach their targets, but some will, simply because there's so many of them. And there's going to be a rather nasty, and I predict very short, war, between Hezbollah and Israel. Iran may be involved, directly or indirectly, and if they are, that will be a much MUCH bigger war. Proft: And it's interesting, just going back to Zakaria, it...to me, what he was talking about was the United States not doing enough to prop up European socialist democracies that are sort of spiraling. And there was more evidence of that over the weekend...the New Year's Eve party in Berlin set up a safe zone for women...this sort of in response to the New Year's Eve festivities in Cologne a year...two years prior, where hundreds of women were sexually molested and robbed by gangs of men, the great experiment in quote-unquote "multiculturalism"...well, the seeds that were sown being reaped in Germany and elsewhere. That combined with aggressive posture Trump has taken with the UN, I mean, $285 million budget cut in the UN, I mean, that's sort of unheard of, even though in the grand scheme of things, that's not a lot of money. What about the continued kind of diminution of Europe on the world stage? Babbin: Well, I think it's gonna continue. I think Europe is struggling very badly with itself, frankly. The Brexit negotiations are hot and cold, going up and going down, and Prime Minister Theresa May will continue to be the designated javelin catcher because no one in the Conservative Party wants to stand there and put up with the abuse from the EU guys. But there are a lot of other problems. Many economies there, particularly the Greek and Italian economies in Europe, are in shambles. And they're going to have to continue to be bailed out. I mean, Germany is tired of paying for all this, and quite frankly, Germany is, I believe, getting tired of Angela Merkel. So there may be some sort of turnover in the next German election, but who knows? There's an awful lot of things in Europe that make Zakaria right, but for all the wrong reasons. Proft: He is Jed Babbin, former United States Deputy Undersecretary of Defense, contributor to the Washington Times and American Spectator, the American Spectator where you can get his 2018 predictions. Jed, thanks so much for joining us, appreciate it. Babbin: Thanks guys, appreciate it!

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