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sanctuary State

Illegal Immigration Vs. Asylum

Is the border being flooded with migrants because of talks of amnesty and sanctuary state laws? Are there any repercussions for those who cross the border seeking asylum but never show up to their court date? Senior Legal Fellow at The Heritage Foundation, Hans Von Spakovsky joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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“Sanctuary” For Gun Owners

Was it finally time to declare “sanctuary” for law-abiding gun owners? Are gun owners in Effingham County flipping the script on Democrats? Effingham County Board member, David Campbell joins Dan and Amy to explain his second amendment sanctuary county resolution.

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Division In The GOP Over Tariffs

Are Trump’s proposed tariffs going to put speed bumps on economic growth? Is Jeff Sessions going to pay a visit to Chicago and address Tiny Dancer and Governor Rauner on their sanctuary state/city policies? Is the left going to cling to their anti gun agenda to win over voters in the upcoming elections? Representative from the 6th Congressional District, Peter Roskam joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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DACA Central To The Democrat Strategy

Are the Dems more interested in using DACA recipients as stylized mascots for electoral purposes than helping them get permanent status in America? Why haven’t “dreamers” addressed their immigration status as adults? Has modern immigration become unmeasured and illegal? National Review columnist and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Victor Davis Hanson joins Dan and Amy to discuss. 

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Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. Can we get a deal done on DACA? Lindsay Graham certainly hopes so. Jacobson: Yeah he made a...used the media yesterday to make a direct plea to President Trump. Graham (from tape): Mr. President, close the deal! 80% of Americans want to give the DACA Kids a better life, and 80% of Americans want to secure our border and fix a broken immigration system. It's gonna take you, Mr. President, working with Republicans and Democrats, to get this done. It's not gonna be done on Twitter, by tweeting. It's gonna be done by talking, and understanding. Proft: Yeah, the...it's kind of a complicated, three-dimensional challenge, though. Not just because of the demagoguery of Durbin and others on the left and the question of their sincerity in getting any kind of deal done that would be serious about border security, despite the fact that, you know, a barrier plus security? It actually works! Imagine that. New York Post, Paul Sperry reporting on El Paso. Jacobson: Oh, yeah. Where there's already a wall in place. I lived in El Paso. Proft: Yeah. When the project first started in 2006, illegal crossings were 122k, by 2010 when the 131-mile fence was completed, from one end of El Paso out into the New Mexico desert, immigrant crossings shrank to 12,251, immigrant crossings. So that's basically a reduction by a factor of ten. So it does work. But Dave Brat, of course...Congressman from Virginia who replaced Eric Cantor, he sat down with an interview for...with Ginny Thomas, Connor Thomas' wife, for Daily Caller. And he said this...here's the challenge with respect to DACA, plus new immigrants, plus welfare reform. Brat (from tape): in 2016 we allowed in 1.8 million, legal and illegal, last year, in one year, 1.8 million. So that's 2 million, plus forma (?), that's 6 million people. And, we've got a bank shot coming...a double bank shot...because we also want to do welfare reform. So Paul Ryan is a genius on welfare reform, so this is all good, going way back, right? Robert Rector and Heritage and all this kind of thing. But the confusing thing there is we're gonna take able-bodied people, right, that have left the workforce, so they're not even counted in the unemployment numbers anymore, so the unemployment rate is really low, it's 3 or 4. But it would be 8 if you counted these folks, right? 20 million people that have left the labor force, they've been displaced by something. So now immigration, we've got 6 million people coming in in one year, displacing American workers, right? And we're gonna do welfare at the same time, trying to get those people who were just displaced back in the workforce. So it's just a colossal problem, we basically have to fix all of this. Proft: And he's multiplying from the 800k based on the idea that if you don't do anything about chain migration or, you know, to address Durbin's delicate sensibilities, family reunification, as the basis for immigration. We were just talking with Joe Pollack about it, give the Dreamers status and then allow them to bring in family members, your backdooring into the country people who did come here illegally of their own volition, and what kind of sense does that make? And then you get to the larger numbers that Brad is talking about and then the implications in the context of welfare reform you want to do, and then underemployed Americans that are looking for work. Turns out to be pretty complicated, and the only person I know that can distill it for us is Victor Davis Hanson, National Review Columnist, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institute, and author of the new book "The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict was Fought and Won"...VDH, thanks so much for joining us, appreciate it. Hanson: Thank you for having me. Proft: So, you opined on this topic, I read your piece in the LA Times. And you started with kind of...let's establish a baseline about these 800k DACA beneficiaries or "Dreamers", to distinguish the actual universe from the stylized vision of them that is being promoted by the press. Hanson: Well I mean, they're not all 19 years old at Stanford, and I mean, the average age is somewhere between 24 and 26. They did come as minors, but most of them are no longer minors, and that means they've had four or five years to address their immigration status as adults, but very few of the 800k did. We hear a lot that they're in the military, less than 1/3 of 1% actually join the military of the 800k, no more than 900 people. And only 5% have ever graduated from high school, about half have dropped out of high school...excuse me, only 5% graduate from college, half have only graduated from high school or are still in high school. So it's...that statistic is kind of what I see, I'm at sort of ground zero of central California. I'm speaking to you when I have neighbors about a quarter-of-a-mile away that are mostly illegal from Mexico. And I don't see...I see their parents, people in their 40s and 50s who came, but I don't see a lot of the children going to Harvard or going out every day and working. We've had a terrible gang problem here, the local town met last night to address the growing epidemic of crime, and it's what a rational person might expect if you were going to import half a million people from one of the poorest areas in Mexico and Central America, and people were going to come without legality, without a high school diploma, and without English. So, how this translates into Democratic politics, I don't think the Democrats can negotiate. Because their whole Electoral College strategy is predicated on flipping the American Southwest from Red to Purple to Blue. And part of that strategy is bringing in voters from very impoverished regions and having them dependent on subsidies and...they don't say that, but if I were a Democratic strategist like Jennifer Palmeri...well, just wrote a memo, the Clinton former Communications Director, saying, you know, "We really need DACA, because it's central to our strategy." She's right about that. So, that's what it's about, and to the degree that Lindsay Graham is sort of wishy-washy or squishy, it's a larger issue for a lot of the Chamber of Commerce, Wall Street Journal Republicans, they want inexpensive labor. (Jacobson: Well you mentioned the...) And between inexpensive labor and...I'm sorry, go ahead. Jacobson: Well yeah, you mentioned the people that live near you and the gang problem in your neighborhood...do you want ICE to just come in and round everyone up and send them back to Mexico? Do you think that's the solution, or maybe just the gang bangers? Hanson: Well I would think that all of us; I, you, your audience...we all know what the solution is. It's to look at the 11 million people who are here illegally, and say you broke the law, the first thing you did when you came here, with the exception of the DACA people, you broke the law. And then it became easier to break other laws, like Federal affidavits or Social Security applications, or disability where people use phony names. But we can solve this problem by saying build the wall, have E-Verify, stop chain migration, and in exchange for that, allow us...and allow us to deport people who have no work history...there's some of them that have never worked, or have committed a serious misdemeanor or felony. And then the rest of the people who speak...can...willing to learn English, to pay a fine, who have a work history, and have not been on public assistance, have not committed a crime...and I don't know how many of that 11 million pool would qualify, but it might be as much as 5 million, not give them AMNESTY but say here's a Green Card. And what you want to do with that Green Card, whether you want to renew it every year, and you qualify, more power to you. If you want to apply for citizenship, get in line like everybody else. And I think that's the solution, but I don't think that can happen because that's antithetical to what the Democratic Party sees as its success in California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and it's not gonna give up on the borders, it's just not. Proft: What....well, right, and Republicans don't do a great job in cornering them to admit what they want is open borders, they wouldn't exclude anybody. They want they want to do immigration policy is based on the perspective of the person who wants to come here, instead of based on the perspective of the American people, including all of the immigrants who ARE here. And I think if you could kind of distill that for the populace, you could kind of cut through some of the racial demagoguery. Hanson: I think so, but in reference to the anecdote, I just deduced...when the SWAT Team did come, it didn't make much difference because we're a Sanctuary State, and we're also, my local community, a Sanctuary City. So it's illegal for them when they came and saw people heading out through the orchards and vineyards in flight, they couldn't pursue them. Because if they were to find out that they were here illegally, and they didn't actually see them committing a crime, there's nothing they could do. And they know that. And there's other things that happened that we're not supposed to talk about, but if you look at certain statistics...so half of all the accidents in Los Angeles County are hit and run. And we have work...California is only 1/6th of the population, we have 1/3 of all the welfare recipients, 22% of people live below the poverty line, one out of every four people in the state wasn't born here in the United States, one out of three people admitted to the hospital for any reason whatsoever are found out to have Type 2 onset diabetes. So there's an enormous amount of social and criminal, justice, educational, and legal challenges that happen when you have immigration that's not diverse...they really talk about diversity but 1/4 of immigrants are from Mexico, and the other quarter are coming from Central America and Latin America. And it's not measured, and it's not legal. Proft: Well, and just to pick up on that, there's an interesting piece by Tyler Cohen, and of course the Left wants to make this about "If you're not for open borders, then you don't like black and brown people and don't want them to come here", and the President's comments didn't help. But Tyler Cohen did an interesting piece in Bloomberg where he points out how educated so many of the African immigrants coming to this country are. 42% of individuals born in Africa and living in the United States have a Bachelor's Degree or better. Those coming from Nigeria, 17% have Master's Degrees, and 3/4 of African immigrants speak English. So there's a group of individuals that are going to have a much easier time assimilating, they've got an educational background that makes it disproportionately likely that they'll be self-sufficient. So, okay, FINE, from Nigeria or other African countries with education, you know, even poorer countries with education and the ability to be self-sufficient and fluency in the language, great, no problem! It's these other problems that present themselves when you don't have a merit-based system like one that brings in individuals as I'm describing. Hanson: I think that's true. And that same paradigm holds true for Latin America. We have people in Fresno County that come from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and they don't come en masse, and they don't come illegally, and they don't come without high school diplomas, and they integrate, assimilate, and intermarry very quickly. That everybody...every statistic, every study that's ever been shown is that if you bring people from one place, and they come in great numbers, and they don't know the native language or customs, and the attitude of the host is to treat them in a tribal manner and not assimilate them...and that's pretty much what we do now in California, then you're not going to have assimilation or integration. And if you're not going to have assimilation and integration, then you're not going to have parity with a host population. If you don't have parity, then the state's going to have to stop...step in and say "Here is help with education, here is help with welfare, here is help with healthcare, here is help with criminal justice, and if you're going to do that, then you're going to develop an industry that says "Well, they don't have parity, not because they came illegally, don't have a high school diploma, but because the host was illiberal, racist, xenophobic." And then you have that entire identity politics process continue, and that's...I hate to be so cynical, but that's what the Progressive movement wants. And that's what, when I hear that they're not going to negotiate on DACA or...Durbin...Durbin could no more go into that meeting and with it...you know, without being disingenuous, he couldn't go in there and just be empirical and say "Mr. President, we really want to protect these 800 kids. If they haven't committed a crime, and they're working or in school, let's just finish the wall. We used to be for a wall, we used to be for E-Verify, we used to oppose chain migration. I myself said that on the record. Let's cut a deal." That's not going to happen. It can't happen. Proft: He is Victor Davis Hanson, historian...you can get his writings at the National Review, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, and the new book from Victor Davis Hanson, "The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict was Fought and Won". Victor Davis Hanson, thanks as always for joining us, appreciate it. Hanson: Thank you.

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If IL Doesn't Want To Enforce The Law, ICE Will

22 illegal immigrants were arrested in Chicago, and local law enforcement released six per "sanctuary city" protocol. Do Democrats care more about immigrant votes than the American workers? Is Trump finally pushing Congress to do its job? Should DACA recipients be granted protected status but have to get in line with the rest of those waiting for American citizenship? Fox News Contributor, Steve Cortes joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy. South Korean president Moon Jae-in attributing the recent warming in relations between his country and that cartoon character dictator north of them in North Korea to President Trump. "Trump, I believe, did a lot," said the South Korean president, to bring North and South Korea together, such that they're discussing Kim Jong-un participating in some of the Winter Olympic Games in South Korea in just a month or so. Jacobson: Yeah. They're gonna walk together, probably, more than likely, you know when they introduce all the countries. And they did this...gosh, was it eight years ago?...for the Olympics, when they walked together as one country. Proft: I understand Kim Jong-un, like his old man, is quite the athlete. I understand that from him, and from fake Twitter DPRK. Jacobson: Well, didn't he get like 11 holes-in-one the first time he ever played golf? Proft: That was Kim Jong-il. Jacobson: Oh, okay! Proft: He was a hell of a golfer. I think Kim Jong-un's sport of choice is figure skating, but I'm not sure. Jacobson: Well every time...I mean, the last time we had the Winter Olympics was four years ago? I watched the North Koreans in figure skating, because everybody...all eyes are on them, to see if they succeed, and if they fail are they gonna get killed when they return to their home country? So... Proft: To see if they can extract themselves from the training table, because it's the first time they've seen FOOD in so long! Jacobson: Well it's...I mean, it's a dictatorship over there, so I feel really bad for the athletes and I'm sure that once they get a taste of freedom and see how the other half of the peninsula's living, they're gonna want to defect and run away. Proft: Well, it's just interesting too, in terms of like...substantive outcomes, despite the Tweeting and the Michael Wolff book and all the stuff, substantive outcomes. You have this Axis of Evil country, as so defined by George W. Bush, this enemy of America, this threat to global stability, and South Korean president giving a hat tip to President Trump over his approach to Kim Jong-un, which he thinks has helped to thaw the relations between North and South, and perhaps stop some of the provocative missile tests. So, just interesting to note. More on this and other topics, we're pleased to be joined by Steve Cortes, Fox News contributor, former Trump Hispanic Advisory Council President. Steve, thanks for joining us, appreciate it. Cortes: Good morning, Dan and Amy! Thanks for having me. Proft: So, what about the continued challenge that...well, those sympathetic to the Trump administration have of trying to separate what Trump is sometimes saying or Tweeting from what he's actually doing, what's actually being accomplished? Cortes: Right. And no, I think those of us who message for Trump, we need to be loud and proud about the many achievements of the first year of the Trump presidency, and optimistic about the successes to come. By the way, one quick word on Kim Jong-un...I want to see HIM in some kind of a lycra suit, whether it's bobsled or something like that. Wouldn't that be great? Proft: I'd like to see that, yeah. He'd be like a little John Candy. Cortes: That's right...that's right. But back to Trump. I think when we look back at the year in the books and look ahead to the prospects of what's going to happen, it's nothing but a record of incredible success, particularly when it comes to the economy, and it's not just the stock market. I actually wrote an article published yesterday in Real Clear Politics, that I think the President...my advice to him is not to focus quite so much...a rising stock market is fantastic, but let's focus more on the REAL economy. Because the stock market did great under President Obama, the REAL economy did not. Particularly for middle income workers. (Proft: Right.) Almost all the benefits of slow growth over the past decade flow to the very highest sectors of the socio-economic strata in America, and that's changed dramatically, thankfully, (cut off) than Trump. As an example, unemployment for people...for workers without a high school diploma, their unemployment just hit a low not seen since the year 2000. So, Hispanic and Black unemployment, all-time lows. So this is a BROAD recovery, this is a real expansion for real America, for Main Street, not just for Wall Street. I love that Wall Street's doing great, but I want to see Main Street do great as well, and they are. So every chance I get, I'm on shows like yours, I'm on Fox News, you know, I'm singing from the rooftops about those types of accomplishments...about the fact that ISIS is all but eliminated, our Southern border is largely under control, President Trump nominated many, and got confirmed MANY, conservative justices. He set a record for a first-year President for circuit court confirmations to the Federal bench. Of course, it's of course soon to be seen in the court (?), and I hope many more to come. At least one more in his first term, and I hope a couple more in the second term. So I think he's reshaping our judiciary, which is BADLY needed, as we saw from that disastrous 9th Court...you know the 9th Circuit just continues to put out appalling rulings, and yet another one on DACA two days ago (Proft: Yeah, it's absurd!). To me, his REAL record is incredible, and I mean, sometimes you have to ignore the cacaphony of the clamoring critics of the media. Yeah, the ones who howl at every Tweet or every apparent misstatement instead of...let's focus on the substance of what he's doing. Jacobson: Yeah, I mean, look at the Dow too. It's surged 7,250 points since the election...that's a 40% gain. I mean, how high do you think it's going to go? Cortes: I think it can go higher, I do. But it's come a heck of a long way. So I don't love, as a market guy...you know, I do politics, I'm fairly new to politics, I've been doing Wall Street for 20 years. As a market guy, I don't love committing new capital here, because it's already had such an incredible run, and if there's one thing I know about markets, even though I'm incredibly bullish on the economy, markets are dynamic and they're volatile and at some point we're going to get a big pullback. I don't know what's going to cause it, it could be North Korea, it could be something different, I don't know. But I'll tell you this...if and when that pullback does occur, I do believe that's a pullback to buy, because I think the paradigm has truly shifted. The Obama stock rally, by the way, I think was in some ways artificial, it was built on artificially low interest rates that practically FORCED money into the stock market. This is very different now, this is REAL growth. But again, I'm not (?) over some stocks...I love that stocks are doing great, it's wonderful, it creates wealth for the country. But I'm WAY more focused on...that wealth, though, focused disproportionally only flows to people who are already very wealthy. I'm much more focused on the American worker, who hasn't done well, who's been struggling for a decade-plus in this country, and their lives are getting better, more prosperous, safer. They're getting bonuses, we've seen hundreds of companies offer bonuses...just today Walmart raised its minimum wage. That's the right way, by the way, to get companies to raise their minimum wage...isn't be executive edict from on high, it's by creating conditions where they feel confident that they CAN pay people more, and we see a lot of companies doing that, not just Walmart, but they're just the latest to announce it. Companies are giving bonuses, they're putting more into charity, they're putting more into employees pension plans, so these are tangible real benefits for the American worker. And I think it's magnificent and it's long overdue. Proft: Part of the conversation about immigration reform is with the American worker in mind as well, at least that Trump's perspective on it as he's previously articulated, so how did you perceive that remarkable meeting he had the other day with Congressional leaders from both parties, where he seemed to be very warm to the idea of permanent status for the DACA recipients, so long as he gets...at least a wall, if not also an end to chain migration and the Diversity Visa Lottery? And also...and also, even going so far as to say "Even if there's things coming out of Congress that I don't love, I'm still gonna sign it, because I respect you guys in this room so much." I mean, really pushing to get a deal done. Cortes: Right, and I think pushing the Congress, to say "Will you finally do your job, rather than just bloviating?", which is what Washington does...has done well for decades. And particularly on this issue, by the way. There's so much grandstanding, particularly on the Left, on immigration. They claim to care a lot about immigrants...I think they care a lot about immigrant VOTES. I think they want to give as much amnesty as possible because they believe those votes will automatically flow their way and they don't care about the American worker, who has to compete, far too often very unfairly, with illegal immigrant labor. But, having said that, I think the President here has a chance...and this is actually an issue where thankfully he actually comes to me for advice, and I've talked to him in person about this. As a Hispanic, as a southern immigrant, I LOVE legal immigration, but we have to do it better in this country, we have to get control of illegal immigration, which we're doing quickly. And regarding DACA and a deal, I think this is a chance where truly everybody can win. I think the DACA recipients, those young adults, are a different category of illegal immigrant, that didn't choose to come here, they didn't choose to break our laws, so in my mind they should be treated differently. We can show heart towards them, but then we can also show toughness, which is END this insane Visa Lottery System. It's terrible for our national and economic security. Restrict chain migration, the idea that one person comes and suddenly the entire village is here, it's just absurd. We need merit-based immigration, chain migration I believe should be restricted only to your spouse and your MINOR children, it can't mean you can bring your cousin and your parents and your grandparents, I mean that's just not sensible, because guess what? We might not WANT all of them. (Cortes and Jacobson spend about 5 seconds talking over each other.) Jacobson: So do you think there should be a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers? Cortes: No, I mean...and by the way, I reject that term "Dreamers", I think the Left often hijacks the language and...Americans have dreams too. So, I don't want to call them "Dreamers". But, the DACA young adults...and they're also not KIDS, the Left always calls them kids (Jacobson: Yeah, they're older now.). Right. So these young adults, pathway to citizenship? I'm fine with that, but I believe they have to get in line. They have to go through the normal process. So, they're protected until then, they're not gonna be deported is my advice, but should they just snap their fingers and get citizenship? No! Not when you have literally millions of people all over the world going through an incredibly lengthy and often expensive process to try and become an American citizen. So people who came here illegally, even if it wasn't of their choosing, can they hop the line and effectively cheat that system? I don't think so, I don't think that's fair. But I do think it's reasonable to say, as long as you're keeping your nose clean, you're working, you're in school...one or the other or both...you're not a criminal, we will allow you to stay here even though you came under illegal circumstances, we will allow you to stay because it wasn't your choice, you came as a child, and you can become a citizen, but you've gotta get in line with everyone else. Proft: He is Steve Cortes, Fox News contributor, former Trump Hispanic Advisory Council president, and you can check out his latest piece on the Trump administration at RealClearPolitics.com. Steve, thanks so much for joining us, appreciate it. Cortes: Thanks, thanks for having me, have a good day.

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The Victims Of The Chicago Way

Why is a second-generation Mexican immigrant with six kids who does everything right still not able to get ahead? Why is he sometimes working seven days a week to provide for his family and put his kids through college while others who are here illegally get these luxuries for free? Dan and Amy talk to a Chicago electrician who gives a perfect holistic explanation about everything wrong and unfair in Illinois.

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Proft: You're on Chicago's Morning Answer. Cristobal: Yeah, hi. How you doing? Proft: Good. Cristobal: Nice...nice to get a hold of you guys. Hey, I just want to give you my perspective. I'm 2nd generation Mexican, my father's from Mexico. I did everything right, I worked, I did extra...I served four years in the service. I'm here now in Chicago, I've got six kids, I put three of my kids through college, I'm still paying on it. I've got three other kids, and it really makes me upset because my wife don't work, she takes care of the other kids, and I'm always hustling, trying to make ends meet. And there's people coming here, and they're getting free college. And they're saying "They're good people!" I'm not saying they're not good people! I know most of them are good people, hard workers. But why am I working so hard just to pay my college? I tried applying for financial aid, they said I make too much. I mean, yeah I make good money, but I got six kids, my wife doesn't work, I'm a Union electrician, I mean...I know I don't make good money, but it's not right! Now I gotta pay all these fees, and these people are just getting handouts. I work six, seven days a week sometimes just to keep afloat! I don't know where...and I stay in Chicago, TRY to stay in Chicago so I can afford the taxes, but now the taxes are going higher, it's getting unaffordable to live in Chicago. And then there's a lot of people who live by me, they're renting out their attics, their basements, their paying their mortgages. I live in one house, with all my kids, my family, and I'm paying everything myself, but these people are renting out their attics, their basements, and then people in Chicago wonder where...why they don't have no money? Because these schools are overcrowded, because these houses are getting taxed for residential when they're actually (free flats?) because they're renting basements, they're renting the attics out. It just seems like I can't get ahead. But that's never told when you live in Chicago, in a Hispanic neighborhood. Proft: Did I tell you...Cristobal, did I tell you Cristobal had something important to say? I undershot it! Cristobal, that is an excellent dissertation on a...kind of the "holistic explanation" for everything that is wrong and unfair and upside down in Chicago, in Illinois. Exactly!

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More Momentum On Crackdown Of Sanctuary Cities After Steinle Verdict

Did the politics of immigration policy factor into the Kate Steinle jury verdict? It was Chicago and Illinois politics as usual after Gov. Rauner promised, on national television, to meet with Brian McCann and his organization to discuss their point of view on sanctuary state legislation but never actually reached out to them. Brian McCann, brother of Dennis McCann who was killed in Chicago by an illegal immigrant and a member of Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime, joins Dan and Amy to discuss the Steinle verdict and Illinois’ sanctuary state designation.

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Proft: Dan and Amy. In February of 2016, New York Police officer Peter Liang was convicted of manslaughter for ricochet shooting a black man. Jacobson: Oh... Proft: Jury in Brooklyn found Liang guilty in connection with the death of a 28 year old black man who was killed by a bullet fired from Liang's gun, in November of 2014. Liang, the police officer, testified that a sudden noise startled him, causing his finger to slip onto the trigger and fire the gun, and it ricocheted off the wall and hit...hit the victim. Jacobson: Well it's weird, you know. Because Kate Steinle's MURDERER...he accidentally pulled the trigger, it ricocheted off the ground, 80 feet into her back, and killed her. Involuntary manslaughter for me, if I was a juror, but he got off on that charge. Proft: Yeah, it's interesting to compare and contrast, now isn't it? Now it should be noted that Liang's conviction was eventually reduced to criminally negligent homicide, he didn't serve any jail time, wasn't sentenced to any jail time. Jacobson: But I'm sure he lost his job. Proft: But that's secondary, it's secondary. The sentencing is secondary to the conviction, and then we can argue about the sentencing, but here in this case I would argue we have jury nullification based on the politics of immigration policy. And speaking of the politics of immigration policy, of course this matters in the state of Illinois, which is a Sanctuary State, and the county of Cook, which is a Sanctuary County, and the city of Chicago, which is a Sanctuary City, and we have a number of cases here where families have been victimized by people in this country illegally, and justice has yet to be served. We mentioned the Tiffany Thrasher case in Straumburg on Friday, and that we mentioned that the individual responsible for her MURDER is, I believe, awaiting trial. And then we also have the case of Dennis McCann. Dennis McCann was killed in Chicago by an illegal immigrant who subsequently fled after arrest, because he was able to post bail. Jacobson: It was a hit and run on Kinzie Avenue, right? Proft: Right. We've spoken to his brother, Brian McCann, before, and Brian McCann joins us again now. Brian, thanks for joining us, appreciate it. McCann: Yeah, thank you. Glad to be here. Proft: So, I know you and some other family members from families who have been victimized by illegal immigrant criminals have started an organization, and I wonder what the discussion was among you and similarly situated people when that Steinle verdict came down last week? McCann: Yeah, well as I'm sure you can imagine, the phones were ringing, and emails were in process all weekend, with my fellow AVIACers...Advocates of Victims of Illegal Alien Crime. And what we're going to try to do is pivot off of this, and hopefully it will be seared into the consciousness of John and Mary Q Public. That's been our lament over the past few years, that most Americans are some sort of indifferent, perhaps even uncaring, certainly not AWARE of how serious the problem of illegal alien crime is. So we're gonna ratchet up our cause, we're gonna try to raise a few more bucks, and do some more travelling, and we thank you for inviting me, and other people are doing radio shows this morning as well. Jacobson: Brian, for those of us who aren't familiar, or maybe they missed out the first time we had you on, or they didn't read John Cass' column, your brother was hit by Saul Chavez, who was on a...just explain what happened that day. McCann: Yeah, it was June 6th, 2011. My brother was calling on a client at a Mexican restaurant, he's an insure...he's a commercial insurance guy. As he was crossing Kedzie Avenue, not far from that famous monument up there, he...Chavez was SERIOUSLY inebriated, and hit him, and dragged him about a city block, and my brother died a violent death. A good Samaritan, an off-duty cop, apprehended him, and Chavez was brought in. He was arraigned, and we were ASSURED by the Cook County Prosecutor not to worry about bail because of something called a detainer, which was explained to us at the time, so we were somewhat comforted that he would receive justice. Little did we know that soon to be the next Congressman, Chuy Garcia, was working tirelessly with Preckwinkle to fashion an ordinance to make the county Sanctuary, which it did in September of 2011, and Mr. Chavez's brother posted the necessary $25,000...in CASH, might I add, and Chavez fled and he's alive and well, driving a truck in Mexico. Proft: And so, I remember when we talked to you about the Sanctuary STATE legislation, to codify this policy that the city and county enacted at the state level, you and other families who've been victimized wanted to speak to the governor about it before he made his decision, ultimately which was to sign it. And the governor had publicly promised you, or I think he had promised you, that he would speak to you. And I wonder if that conversation ever happened. McCann: Never...never did. He promised...he promised us in front of, I don't know, about 20 million people, and Fox News that night, Bret Baier was in town...so I thought "Well, that should make for some leverage." But no, he never reached out to us. He did say that he talks to lots of families, but we suspect he talks more to families that are from the other side than to us. (inaudible) is trying to sue for documents on that, by the way, but I don't know if they'll ever get anywhere. They're trying. Proft: So the interesting thing about this, you suggest that you're trying to get families to pay attention to this, residents of Illinois to get animated by this, and in other states by the way. And when you look at the survey research, people WILDLY oppose this, I mean, Republicans, Democrats, this is like 3-to-1 AGAINST this policy. So people kind of viscerally get it, it may not be the kind of thing that animates them if they or someone they know hasn't been victimized, but they certainly get the logic of your position. And I wonder now if this is a time now because of that Steinle verdict to try and focus people's attention on their legislators, and put pressure on them to consider a repeal of the legislation Governor Rauner signed. McCann: Well, I talked to a young lady the other day, she's campaign manager for, I guess, Jeanne Ives? And I think she's gonna be on with you this morning, later on I think? So she wants me to join her on the steps of the jail, I think on Thursday, let me take a look at my notes. I guess she wants to announce a repeal effort, if she's elected Governor. And I certainly support that. Now, out in California, Don Rosenberg, who is part of our organization, he is raising money to try to do a ballot initiative. I don't think we can do ballot initiatives here, but they're... Proft: Not as easily, right. McCann: They're trying to do it out there, so lots of luck for Don! But, that could generate a lot of buzz too, because California's got more issues related to this than we do. Jacobson: But you must feel betrayed by Governor Rauner! The fact that he didn't call you, at first he said he would call you, and now we're a sanctuary STATE. McCann: I mean, I'm an old student of political science, I understand. Ironically, I was kind of PLEASED with what happened. You know, aside from immigration issues, I'm a big proponent of vouchers, in spite of the fact that I'm a retired public school teacher. When he slipped that tax credit voucher thing in there, privately I was pretty pleased with him. So it's mixed, politics is mixed, you never get what you want, but sure...betrayed? I don't know...I don't know how to respond, he...I'm a realist, I'm a realist. Proft: Yeah, you're used to Illinois Chicago politics, which is to say you're used to... McCann: Being around this town for so long, yknow... Jacobson: You just keep your expectations low? But I mean, your brother is GONE, he's not coming back, and his killer is alive and well down there in Mexico. Do you ever want to just go down there and take some street justice? McCann: Yeah, well...we're gonna start a posse. And I'm 70 years old, so I remember the old Westerns. I always wanted to start a posse when I was kid. Maybe we'll start one. You wanna join? Jacobson: Yeah! I'll be the Swedish member of your posse! Proft: Yeah, we'll get the Wild Bunch together, yeah! McCann: We'll have Poncho Vida on horseback, and we'll have a good time. Proft: Do you speak with other families? I know you mentioned your friend in California, what about other families in Illinois, do you... McCann: You know, you guys ought to...and I can send you the number...Eric Brady, he lost his wife Jeanine, New Year's Eve down in Champaign...Champaign, of all places, Champaign went sanctuary a few years ago. And Jeanine worked down at the American Legion, her husband's a veteran, and she was driving home New Year's Eve, on Interstate...what is it, 70, 74, down there? 74, she was on her way home, and this kid from Guatemala was on the wrong side of the Interstate and hit her head on and killed her instantly. The Guatemalan was rushed to the hospital, to see if he had any injuries, and the stupid Illinois state police didn't assign a deputy to him, so they released him that morning and he fled to Guatemala. I've had radio stations down in St Louis talk to Eric, you oughta talk to him, it's unbelievably tragic, very recent. Proft: And here's the thing about this to, to get your perspective, and I mean mine on this, I'm a pro-LEGAL-immigration guy, but it seems to me that all the politicians say, and the Steinle case is such a poignant reminder of this, "Yeah, people that are here that have committed violent crimes, obviously they have to be deported!" And yet, they're not. And they're deported...or they're deported...and they return time and time again and then find safe haven in cities like San Francisco or Chicago, and so it's very difficult to have a thoughtful conversation on how we govern legal immigration in this country when politicians across the political spectrum can't keep that sort of foundational promise to expel violent individuals who shouldn't be in this country in the first place. McCann: Yeah. Yeah I couldn't agree with you more, and how're we gonna resolve this? God only knows. The Democratic party, the progressives that run these cities...they're a different breed, they're a different coalition, and they're not the Roosevelt Democrats that my mother and father and my wife's family was. They're not real pro-labor, you know...I'm Irish! We wanted to run the cities. But we didn't want CRIMINALS. I don't know. We didn't want to protect criminals, and we didn't want to protect alternative marriage schemes, and all sorts of other...it's a different world out there, and somehow we have to punch through it and get people in middle America to appreciate that. I've seen that data you mentioned, Dan, but boy, when you're talking to the average man on the street, they think...Kate Steinle was an outlier, it was an isolated case. They really don't realize how SERIOUS this crime situation is. We...it's impossible to aggregate data BECAUSE of sanctuary cities. I mean, we get together with ICE but really we're doing it on our own, and there's been well over 200 murders, killings, in the last 12 years, these are some of our early figures, not to mention assaults, rapes, identity theft, you name it, all felonies. The public has got to get it! And we're praying and hoping that we can pivot off of this Steinle thing and change a few minds and maybe...get this repeal effort underway. And I'll talk to Miss Ives later this week, and hopefully I can help her. Proft: All right, Brian, we appreciate you raising the profile on the issue. He is Brian McCann, Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime, it's...how do you pronounce the acronym? McCann: AVIAC.US is the website, and we have a button, and we need some money, so please help. Proft: AVIAC.US is the website. McCann: AVIAC.US is the website. Proft: He is Brian McCann, Brian thank you so much for joining us. McCann: You bet guys, thank you so much.

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