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tiny dancer

Political Ruling Class Families

What binds all these politicos together? How did the Obama administration perfect the practice of “smash and grab?” What are the behind closed doors dealings of some of the potential 2020 presidential candidates? What was Tiny Dancer’s cut after leaving the Obama White House? "Clinton Cash" and "Secret Empires" author, Peter Schweizer joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Did Van Dyke Go To Jail For Doing His Job?

In the four years between the MacDonald shooting and Van Dyke’s conviction, there have been 2,500 murders, and more than 11,000 people shot and wounded in Chicago. What's the future of policing in Chicago? What about Trump’s idea to reinstate stop and frisk? Did Tiny Dancer buy the silence of black Alderman in exchange for campaign cash payoffs during his election runoff? Chicago FOP President, Kevin Graham joins Dan and Amy to discuss the Van Dyke verdict. 

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What Comes After Tiny Dancer?

After a disastrous seven years in office, Rahm Emanuel stunned the Chicago political world when he announced he wasn't going to run for re-election. But looking ahead now, what – and who – is next for the city? On this edition of Illinois Rising, Dan Proft and Pat Hughes take a prospective look at the Chicago mayoral race, from both political and policy perspectives. They also reflect on Emanuel's damaging two terms, and how other politicians are reacting to his departure.

WATCH THE FULL EPISODE HERE

SEGMENT ONE

SEGMENT TWO

SEGMENT THREE

SEGMENT FOUR

SEGMENT FIVE

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The Obama's 2020 Netflix Lineup

The Obama’s 2020 Netflix Lineup

Producing quality agitprop is a team effort.

So it’s nice to see the Democrat Socialists rally for the Obamas to help them consummate their $50 million Netflix production deal.

The lineup really assembles itself:

Cory Booker will star in a remake of Spartacus. Only this time, Spartacus is the wealthy senator and he only thinks he’s a slave.  He runs around Capitol Hill yelling, “I am Spartacus,” with no one else echoing the sentiment.

Kamala Harris will play the lead in the spinoff, How to Get Away with Murdering the Legal Canons. The ripped-from-the-headlines season premiere will feature a bizarre temper tantrum masquerading as an interrogation of a SCOTUS nominee.

Rahm Emanuel is scheduled to reprise the role of Abby Lee Miller from the Lifetime hit, Dance Moms. The Emanuel version will be entitled Tiny Dancer Moms.

Chris & Andrew Cuomo will play conjoined twins in the long-awaited sequel to Stuck on You.

Other shows under consideration:

Brian Williams as a bomb tech in a remake of The Hurt Locker.

Rachel Maddow as K.D. Lang in the biopic, Crying.

And Elizabeth Warren as Henry Fonda playing Tom Joad in a stirring interpretation of John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath.

It’s a lineup that’s binge-and-purge worthy.

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Changing The Guard In Chicago’s Mayoral Race

“If you didn’t have the guts to run for mayor of Chicago when Rahm was in office, what will make the public believe that you have the guts to make tough decisions to move the city forward.” Is it a new day in Chicago or same old day with a new face? Does the city need a problem solver rather than another politician? Paul Vallas joins Dan and Amy to make the case that it’s him you should want.

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Tiny Dancer Bows Out

Unlike Daley, did Rahm getting pushed out by the city and not the political insiders? Is Rahm looking to cut a deal with someone he can endorse? Did he accomplish anything? Does the political machine still have the same power they once held? Where’s the Republican Party? Chicago Tribune columnist, John Kass joins Dan and Amy to discuss the curtains closing on Mayor Emanuel and to share his take on the city’s mayoral race.  

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Poor Use Of Police Force

Why are only 17% of murders in Chicago solved? Why did Tiny Dancer close down the detective bureaus in the most dangerous parts of the city? Does Chicago have to incorporate a new approach to prevent crime? Is political correctness interfering with the work of police officers? President of the Crime Prevention Research Center, John Lott Jr. joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Which Issues Will Drive IL Voters To The Polls?

With just months to go before the 2018 midterm elections – and a Chicago mayoral election shortly thereafter in 2019 – campaign season is in full swing across Illinois. Where do things stand for Bruce Rauner and J.B. Pritzker? For Rahm Emanuel? On this edition of Illinois Rising, Dan Proft and Chicago Tribune Editorial Board Member Kristen McQueary break down how several policy issues could impact the governor's race in November as well as the Chicago mayoral election in February. Chief among them: Rauner's betrayal of social conservatives on publicly-funded abortion, the health of city and state pensions and the ever-increasing property tax burden Illinoisans face.

WATCH THE FULL EPISODE HERE

SEGMENT 1

SEGMENT 2

SEGMENT 3

SEGMENT 4

SEGMENT 5

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Chicago Public Schools: The Predators’ Playground

Everything big city Democrat mayors like Rahm Emanuel do is for the kids, they tell us with ersatz earnestness.

Rahm—Tiny Dancer, I call him--is quick to take up cause célèbres like the Parkland high school gun control brigade in the name of school safety.

What Rahm and his leftist colleagues won’t do is change school systems run by the adults for the adults—even when some of those adults are child predators.

In a blockbuster expose, the Chicago Tribune documented a long-running sex abuse scandal inside the Chicago Public Schools that should end Tiny Dancer’s career, that should be international news on par with coverage given the Catholic Church’s sex abuse scandal, and that should serve as a warning to public school parents across the country.

According to the Tribune, since Tiny Dancer was elected in 2011, 430 reports of sexual abuse, assault or harassment have been investigated with credible evidence of misconduct found in 230 of those incidents.

The Tribune also found that school administrators may have acted criminally in failing to report incidents of abuse to the state’s child welfare agency.

Worse yet, the story identified repeated failures to screen out Chicago Public Schools employees with prior arrests related to alleged sexual offenses involving children.

A lot of attention is devoted to holding pols and their appointees accountable for threats to kids in school that come from the outside.

What about the threats they welcome inside and cover for?

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Is Identity Politics A Dead End?

Are half of the kids attending college right now even qualified? Does identity politics do nothing but raise the potential for conflict between people? Is Tiny Dancer demanding success from minority students to simply virtue signal rather than build an infrastructure for them to achieve success? George Mason University economics professor, Walter Williams joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Division In The GOP Over Tariffs

Are Trump’s proposed tariffs going to put speed bumps on economic growth? Is Jeff Sessions going to pay a visit to Chicago and address Tiny Dancer and Governor Rauner on their sanctuary state/city policies? Is the left going to cling to their anti gun agenda to win over voters in the upcoming elections? Representative from the 6th Congressional District, Peter Roskam joins Dan and Amy to discuss.

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Tiny Dancer Institutionalizing Voter Fraud

The new Chicago ID for illegal immigrants would be a valid voter ID. What could go wrong? Is this what happens in a city with an absence of the rule of law? Does Tiny Dancer or any members of the Chicago City Council care that they are disenfranchising the vote of legal Chicago citizens? At least one member does. 41st Ward Alderman Anthony Napolitano joins Dan and Amy to make the case for the rule of law in Chicago.

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Proft: Good morning, Dan and Amy, and Amy, the widow of Commander Paul Bauer issued this letter of thanks to the city. Jacobson: Yeah, it's really touching. I can't read all of it, you know for time constraints, but basically it starts with "I sit here writing a letter that I never thought I'd have to write. On February 13th, my husband and Grace's dad, Paul Bauer, was violently taken from us. Needless to say, our hearts are broken in a million pieces and our lives are forever changed. But that's not the reason I am writing. I'm writing to thank the people of the great city of Chicago for the outpouring of love and support at this horrendous time in our lives. Paul would have been terribly upset that inconvenienced so many of you with parking restrictions in our beloved Bridgeport. He would have winced at the thought the Dan Ryan closed down for the funeral procession. He never wanted to be in the spotlight. He never thought of himself, only others. I want to thank those of you that waited HOURS in the cold to attend his wake and funeral. You have no idea how much that meant to us. If I wasn't...If I wasn't out of tears, I would have cried the entire route to the cemetery. I want you to know that I saw each and every one of you who stopped on the side of the road to salute as the hearse went by. I saw the blue blanket draped on the fence along the Expressway, and the large banners with Paul's pictures. I saw people of every color taking time out of their day, not only to pay respects to Paul, but to the entire Chicago Police Department. They are the men and women who selflessly put their lives on the line each day to protect people they don't even know, they are my new family." And then in closing, she writes "One man almost stole my faith in humanity, but the city of Chicago and the rest of the nation restored it, and I want to thank you for that. Sincerely, Erin Bauer." Proft: Very thoughtful, well-written letter, very nice, and she's right about being such a unifying event for the city, which is nice because those sorts of things rarely happen in this city. I mean, the last instance like that I can remember that was similar was Cardinal George's funeral. So anyway, I want to get to some issues, but since our next guest, prior to being a Chicago Alderman, Chicago firefighter, Chicago Police officer if I'm remembering correctly. He is Anthony Napolitano, who is the Alderman for the 41st Ward of Chicago. Anthony, thanks for joining us again, appreciate it. Napolitano: Good morning, thank you very much for having me. Proft: And just want to get, as a first responder yourself, and your previous career, just want to get your...give you an opportunity to reflect on Commander Bauer and what his wife had to say, as you just heard Amy read. Napolitano: You know, it's absolutely incredible, I'd like to say God...you know, rest in peace to Commander Bauer. My brother worked for him, he had the great opportunity to work for him, great man. You will never hear a bad word about the commander. And I think she's right, I think that when the city feels like you lose hope, especially with all the crime issues. that there is faith, and there is...we can find humanity in our Police Department. They're not all bad apples, there's a lot of incredible apples in that department, and they're willing to jump in when everyone's jumping out. So you know, I can't say how proud of him I am as a man and as a Police officer because he wore that uniform with pride and he showed it. Proft: Well, moving on to this issue that is generating less pridefulness in the city; municipal ID cards, that "Tiny Dancer" is launching for undocumented immigrants, and others..."will be a valid form of identification for people both registering to vote and voting in Chicago," according to a letter he sent out to you and your colleagues on the City Council last week. Now, you know, I try to keep up on these things, but...is voting in Chicago...is it still that you have to be a US Citizen and a registered voter to vote there? Or is that no longer the case, can people bring in proxy votes from Central America? Napolitano: *laughing* No, you still have to be registered, you still have to be a US Citizen. And one thing that really irks me as well is you don't even...it is right now, as you now...you don't even have to show an ID, it's just done by signature, which is another issue that I think should be covered, besides how I believe this municipal ID is not a good idea. I think that going into a voting booth and saying "Yeah, I'm Tim Smith." and them saying "Okay, sign here. Now go vote." I think that's another guard we're putting down, we're taking our rights away from our citizens. Proft: Well, yeah, and how is this is a valid identification to register to vote when it is by definition an ID for people who are ineligible to register to vote, at least in part? Napolitano: That's what drives me crazy. Now I'm just gonna put this out there, I'm not anti-immigrant, I'm the first-generation son of an immigrant, so that anti-immigrant stuff is nonsense. Here...look at this concept alone. You're giving an ID for people to...and you're basically stating that you can take this and go in to vote. But guess what? After you register and get this working ID...we're gonna throw out all the information on you, so that no one can follow up with you. No one can find out what, you know...if you aren't a resident, if you are illegal, here illegally, no one could follow up with you, because we're getting rid of that information, which shows that this shouldn't be done anyways! We're giving a documented ID to people who are not documented. (Proft laughs in disbelief.) And in the statement, it's saying "Hey, guess what? The onus is on the Board of Elections to ask you and hope that you attest to being a resident or a citizen." So I mean... Jacobson: So, what do you need to bring forward to get this ID? A bank account statement, a water bill, a gas bill, birth certificate... Napolitano: Amy, that's the greatest part. If you look at it, it's based on a three-point system, and you have to get up to three points to get...to have the valid forms to get this ID. I think one of them is to have A NAME. It's so ridiculous, the setup to get to three points. It's...they have it all written down, I don't know it all verbatim but I can send that to you guys as well. But when you look at it, you're gonna get the three points just for having a power bill, for a bill to your house, and that's understandable but...for your kids being in school you can have one, that...but anybody can get that these days. Proft: *stammering* I mean...I mean...my...my...oh my head...you and a couple of your colleagues have pointed out the obvious. Nick Sposato who is a 38th Ward Alderman, "I'm not sure the validity of this, they may not have citizenship, voter fraud would be my biggest concern." Oh, do you think? Gilbert Villegas, though, the Latino Caucus Chairman on the City Council said this, "It's not changing the state law, and there's nothing stopping someone from getting a fake ID now and going to try to vote." Well, that's a really interesting argument that Viegas makes. So nothing stops someone from trying to commit voter fraud right now...so let's INSTITUTIONALIZE voter fraud to make it easier! Napolitano: Yeah, you know...and I'm a big fan of Gil, we get along great. I think on that topic, the weak comeback for a lot of other people is, "Well, we're hoping this...this is not going to be an issue." Well, we're giving the opportunity for it to BE an issue. And I just...I can't...I don't sleep well at night thinking about that. That's...that's just not right, we're supposed to be defending citizens' rights, and we're saying "Hey, we don't THINK this is going to be an issue! But if it is, we'll deal with it when happens." And that's wrong, and here's the best thing: how convenient that this is happening right before an election cycle? I mean... Proft: *laughs loudly* Well, I mean...yeah...just...*hands in air*...it's INSANE. Jacobson: So, is there any way to stop this? Napolitano: I don't...you know what...I don't...here's what I know and it doesn't let me sleep well at night, is when we sat in these meetings talking about this ID, I and a couple of other colleagues say "Well, is this gonna be used for voting?" And it was LAUGHED UPON, it was like "No, this is gonna give people that don't have IDs the ability to cash their checks, or to get a Library card." It was actually LAUGHED at, "Oh, you're crazy to think that this could be used for VOTING." And then, in their general...in their ordinance, it says "Hey, you can use this to vote!" I mean, is it gonna be stopped? I don't know, it matters on how many people we can get together to say "You're writing what you can do with this, and that's VOTE." Proft: Well this side...this...this is unconstitutional (Napolitano: Absolutely!), and it has to be litigated. And the...I...do they understand, umm, you have the possibility, the DISTINCT possibility I would say, of disenfranchising someone from their vote. If somebody votes illegally, that is taking away the vote of a police officer, a firefighter, a first responder, an ALDERMAN for that matter. It is...it is...this is LUNACY! This is the absence of the rule of law. Napolitano: This is the absolute fear that a handful of us had going into these meetings, that this was going to happen. And just a short couple of months later, it's exactly what the iD is being used for. And it...it's...it is SO unconstitutional and it's so...we're taking away American rights of voting, the right to be a citizen that you have the right to vote in elections. We're taking that away! And I don't think anybody's really batting an eye at it! It scares me! It's not right. Proft: And then do you think it has something to do with...and you mentioned that, you know...oh, not coincidentally, this is in cycle, and you have a certain Mayor who is basically a persona non grata in the black community, he's gonna need the Latino community to get re-elected. And does that perhaps have anything to do with it? Jacobson: *sarcastically* NOOOOOOO...... Napolitano: I think it's...I mean, when you look at when this is coming out, it's right before an election cycle. And it states in the ordinance, "Hey, you can vote like this!" I mean, it's telling people "You can go vote". And then on top of it, in the ordinance it's written "We will destroy all of your information after you come and get your ID.", which means nobody can follow up with you after you got your ID. So, what are we doing? We're...we're working in reverse. Jacobson: I'm reading this point system that you turned me onto, I mean it's unbelievable. You can have a Driver's License from a FOREIGN country, that's worth two points. (Napolitano: Yes!) I mean, it's crazy! Even if you have an EXPIRED foreign passport, you can bring that in, THAT is worth two points. Napolitano: Yeah, and I mean, correct if I'm wrong, but it was that you just had to get to three points, correct? Jacobson: Exactly. So I can just bring in an expired passport from ten years ago and that's worth two points, and I just have to show something else. I mean... Napolitano: I'll tell you one thing...sitting at election booths in the last couple elections, one of the things I noticed people are very VERY angry about, and they actually disclaim it in the voting booths is "Why don't you WANT to see my ID?" And that makes people angry. Jacobson: I say that EVERY TIME. Napolitano: Yeah! Jacobson: Alderman, I say that every time. I go "Don't you want to see it?" They go "No no, we know who you are." I go "No no! But do you REALLY know who I am? Here's my ID!" Napolitano: Yeah, and it's based off a signature. You know how many people we had since I've been in this position, now, the number of calls to the office that..."Hey, I went in the booth to vote, and I was told I'd already voted." I mean, that's...all you have to do is look at the voting sheets and say "Hey, this guy votes this way for the last 30 years, but he hasn't voted in five years." Somebody can look at those sheets and go "Hey, he ain't gonna be there, I'm gonna go in and vote on his behalf." Jacobson: Yeah, I have a friend who has two homes...yeah, she has two homes and she votes twice. EVERY ELECTION, votes twice. And I tell her every time "You're gonna get arrested for voter fraud! I hope you do." Proft: Well, the voter fraud is just a fictional thing, according to so many on the Left, who...that we talk to, and talk about...that doesn't exist. Well, Chicago's trying to remedy that, if it doesn't exist, to make SURE that it exists! Unbelievable. 41st Ward Alderman Anthony Napolitano, Anthony thanks so much for joining us and talking about this issue, appreciate it. Napolitano: My pleasure, thanks for having me!

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Stop Forking Over Your Lunch Money

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